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HIGHLIGHT

Reservoir is part of a water conservation system at Dholavira dating to the 3rd millennium BC in mod

October 18, 2017
UC San Diego Cyber-Archaeologist Participates in ‘Dialogue of Civilizations'

UC San Diego archaeologist Thomas E. Levy is back in San Diego after participating in a National Geographic Society 'Dialogue of Civilizations' in India focused on the subcontinent's 3rd millennium BC Harappan Civilization.[more]

 

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12.16.2004
"EE Times"
Project to produce middleware for ubiquitous networks

Writer Colin Holland of Electronic Engineering Times in the UK reports on RUNES -- "a consortium of European scientists setting out to enable the billions of electronic devices in everyday use to be networked together for use in applications from healthcare and transport systems to manufacturing and disaster recovery." The article notes that UCSD is one of the only U.S. institutions involved in the project. There, it is led by CSE professor Rajesh Gupta, a participant in Calit2, with support from CSE assistant professor in residence Ingolf Krueger and others.
[more]

12.16.2004
"Black Issues in Higher Education"
University of California Institute to Fund IT Collaboration Between Faculty

The California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Cal(IT)2), a collaborative venture of the University of California, Irvine and the University of California, San Diego, will administer a new $300,000 prize to promote information technology collaboration among its faculty.

12.15.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Duo fascinated by fowl

Science writer Bruce Lieberman profiles the work on genome rearrangement by two UCSD professors affiliated with Calit2: computer science and engineering professor Pavel Pevzner, and math professor Glenn Tesler. The article recounts their involvement in analyzing human, mouse, rat and most recently the chicken genome.
[more]

12.13.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Five Questions: Sheldon Brown

In an interview for the Personal Technology section, Jon Sidener quizzes New Media Arts layer leader Sheldon Brown, director of UCSD's Center for Research in Computing and the Arts (CRCA), about the new Experimental Game Lab. The lab recently received a grant of $290,000 from Carlsbad video-game company Sammy Studios.
[more]

12.13.2004
"San Diego Business Journal"
Computer Lab Is Not Just Playing Games

Writer Brad Graves reports on development of the Experimental Game Lab at UCSD, led by visual arts professor Sheldon Brown. The lab is a partnership with Sammy Studios, Calit2 and the Center for Researc in Computing and the Arts.
[more]

12.10.2004
"HPCwire"
Engineers Join Consortium to Advance 'Invisible' Computing

The online high-performance computing news service reports that "computer scientists and electrical engineers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have joined a consortium of mostly        European scientists setting out to network together the billions of electronic devices in everyday use." UCSD division director Ramesh Rao is one of several participants in the RUNES project who are affiliated with Calit2.

[more]

12.10.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Chicken genome sequenced

Associated Press writer Malcolm Ritter reports on the sequencing of the chicken genome. Union-Tribune science writer Bruce Lieberman contributed to the article, quoting two Calit2-affiliated faculty members at UCSD: Jacobs School of Engineering professor Pavel Pevzner, and Mathematics professor Glenn Tesler.
[more]

12.10.2004
"The New Hampshire"
Broadcom Co-Founder Establishes Research Competition at UC I

Dr. Henry T. Nicholas III, co-founder and retired co-chairman and CEO of Broadcom Corp., has established a $300,000 prize competition, to be administered by The California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), which will promote collaboration among UCI`s faculty. The Nicholas Foundation Prize for Cross-Disciplinary Research will recognize ''high-risk/high-yield'' pilot research investigations that are relevant to Calit2`s mission and hold potential for leading to further discoveries or large-scale extramural funding.
[more]

12.9.2004
"Medical News Today"
NIH Provides $32.8 Million to Enhance Biomedical Informatics Research Network

NIH's National Center for Research Resources announces it will provide nearly $33 million to enhance the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN), whose coordinating center is at UCSD and led by School of Medicine professor Mark Ellisman. Ellisman and UC Irvine professor Steve Potkin, a BIRN principal investigator, are active participants in Calit2, and BIRN itself is a prmary application in medical imaging for the institute-led OptIPuter project.
[more]

12.8.2004
"PhysOrg.com"
Invisible Computing

Computer scientists and electrical engineers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have joined a consortium of mostly European scientists setting out to network together the billions of electronic devices in everyday use.
[more]

12.8.2004
"United Press International"
NIH gives $32.8 million to bioinformatics

The National Institutes of Health said it will invest $32.8 million "to support collaborative efforts to use information technologies to aid medical research," the news service reports. The money will be invested in the Biomedical Informatics Research Network, a multi-university effort with its coordinating center at UCSD and led by School of Medicine professor Mark Ellisman. Ellisman and UC Irvine professor Steve Potkin are principal investigators on BIRN and active participants in Calit2, and BIRN itself is one of the principal applications of the institute-led OptIPuter grid networking project.
[more]

12.7.2004
"KPBS Radio"
Video Games

For a show about video games, the host of "These Days" -- Tom Fudge -- interviewed Sheldon Brown, drector of the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts, and New Media Arts layer leader of Calit2. Also in this segment: Derek Burrill, Assistant Professor of Media Studies at UC Riverside, and Pete Metzger, Video Game Critic for the Los Angeles Times. Length: 25:00
[more]

12.2.2004
"Irvine World News"
High Tech Building Opens

The California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology has unveiled its $44 million state-of-the-art facility at UCI.
[more]

11.26.2004
"Science Magazine"
Smart Dust Next Wave

When many people hear the word "dust," they immediately think of a powdery substance with little intrinsic value. But former Calit2 graduate fellow and UCSD chemistry grad student Jamie Link writes in this first-person article that "dust-sized devices may have important scientific applications."
[more]

11.25.2004
"TheFeature.com"
Wireless Research's Biggest Hurdle and Largest Opportunity

Writer David Pescovitz  reports that "Ramesh Rao, a director of the California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology, aims to get wireless networks on talking terms." And in a Q&A, Rao tells the reporter that "no system is designed around the assumption that there will be others in the neighborhood. That's little bit of a geeky answer, but I truly believe it's one of the most important problems" in wireless research.  [The author posted a related item on the BoingBoing blog.]
[more]

11.23.2004
"Electronic Engineering Times"
Smart dust made to 'escort' molecules to sensors

R. Colin Johnson reports on work at UCSD by chemist Michael Sailor -- a Calit2 participant -- on smart-dust magnetic silicon nanoparticles. "Someday such chaperones might surround cancer cells and "escort" them to the exit," he reports. The article also notes that "Bioengineering associate professor Sangeeta Bhatia and Austin Derfus, a graduate student working in her lab at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering, also contributed to the development of Sailor's smart dust."
[more]

11.22.2004
"New University"
UC Executives Dedicate New Calit2 Building

In UC Irvine's weekly online magazine, writer Allan Taing reports on the opening ceremonies and dedication of the new Calit2 building at UC Irvine, noting that "the four-story, 120,000-square-foot facility cost $44 million to construct... [and is] the first building completed among the California Institutes for Science and Innovation." The article quotes UCI Chancellor Ralph Cicerone and Albert Yee, director of the institute's Irvine division.
[more]

11.22.2004
"CCN News"
Tech-Savvy Facility

UC Irvine unveiled its $44 million high-tech research facility in a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, Nov. 19. 
[more]

11.22.2004
"Electronic Engineering Times"
Consortium sheds light on dark fiber's potential

Nicolas Mokhoff reports on efforts of the National LambdaRail to light up "dark fiber" to support data-intensive scientific research and collaboration. He notes that "a few 10-Gbit lambdas are already owned and operated by research agencies, including Pacific Wave, UltraScienceNet and OptiPuter." Mokhoff says OptIPuter PI and Calit2 director Larry Smarr is on a "collaboratory kick", and quotes him as saying, "The goal of a collaboratory is to eliminate distance between collaborating scientists and remote scientific instruments, distributed data repositories and other resources."
[more]

11.20.2004
"Orange County Register"
Nicholas Creates UCI Research Contest

Henry T. Nicholas III, former cheif executive of Broadcom, has created a $3000,000 research competition at UC Irvine. The competition will be run by Calit2.
[more]

11.20.2004
"Daily Pilot"
College Builds Toward Future

The California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology officially opened its new $44-million research facility Friday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony in front of nearly 350 university faculty and industry leaders.
[more]

11.19.2004
"City News Service"
Broadcom Co-Founder Establishes Research Competition at UCI

Henry T. Nicholas III, co-founder and retired co-chairman and chief executive of Broadcom Corp., announced the establishment of a $300,000 research competition at UC Irvine. The competition will be administered by Calit2.

11.19.2004
"Collegiate Presswire"
Broadcom Co-Founder Establishes Research Competition at UCI

Dr. Henry T. Nicholas III, co-founder and retired co-chairman and CEO of Broadcom Corp., has established a $300,000 prize competition, to be administered by the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), which will promote collaboration among UCI`s faculty. The Nicholas Foundation Prize for Cross-Disciplinary Research will recognize ''high-risk/high-yield'' pilot research investigations that are relevant to Calit2`s mission and hold potential for leading to further discoveries or large-scale extramural funding.
[more]

11.18.2004
"Orange County Register"
Fantastic Voyage

Technology writer Gary Robbins interviewed UC Irvine computer scientist Joerg Meyer about visualizations that provide "virtual tours of the blood stream and other bio-pathways, giving physicians and medical researchers a sense of perspective they otherwise wouldn’t have." The article notes that Meyer's latest creation -- a virtual tour of a pig's blood vessel -- would be on display Nov. 19 when UCI opened its new Calit2 building.

[more]

11.16.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Collboration on homeland security

In a joint op-ed piece, UCSD chancellor Marye Anne Fox and SDSU president Stephen Weber highlight university efforts to improve homeland security in the San Diego region. The article refers to several Calit2 projects, including remote sensing in the Gaslamp District that will "allow emergency officials and first responders to assess damage and respond to disasters more quickly in support of local government crisis management programs."
[more]

11.16.2004
"Game Industry News"
Sammy Studios Donates to U. of California

Sammy Studios donated technology worth more than $290,000 to UCSD's Experimental Game Lab, the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts, and Calit2. Institute director Larry Smarr and CRCA director Sheldon Brown are quoted.
[more]

11.15.2004
"IEEE Spectrum"
View from the Top

In a profile for the special November 2004 issue, the magazine interviewed San Diego Supercomputer Center Francine Berman, a Calit2 participant and computer-science professor at UCSD. Berman is quoted as saying the most important technology of the last forty years is "parallelism. Parallel technologies, algorithms, and applications are a fundamental part of virtually all modern technology, from computer design to storage to networking to communication."
[more]

11.12.2004
"The Daily Transcript"
Sammy Studios funds UCSD game lab

In its Local Scene column, the newspaper reports that "Carlsbad-based video game creator Sammy Studios has given the University of California, San Diego more than $290,000 to support the university's Experimental Game Lab at the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts." CRCA and the game lab will be located in the new Calit2 building, where it will be part of the institute's New Media Arts group.

[more]

11.11.2004
"HPCwire"
Smarr Touts Optical Networks as Nation's Future

 In an interview with the online publication's editor Tim Curns, Calit2 director Larry Smarr emphasizes the importance of networking to U.S. competitiveness. After admitting that the U.S. is behind Canada and parts of Europe in dedicated optical links between scientific institutions, Smarr said he's "very hopeful that we'll see the NSF now begin to fund participants and attaching to it and utilizing it really to create a whole, new generation of high-performance networking, science and engineering."
[more]

11.10.2004
"Pittsburgh Tribune-Review"
Powerful computers in demand

Michael Yeomans reports on the start of SC2004 in Pittsburgh, with an overview of the state of supercomputing. He profiles "the National LambdaRail project -- a consortium of universities seeking to build a nationwide fiber-optic computing infrastructure to support researchers -- freeing them from the congestion of the common Internet," and quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as calling it "disruptive technology of the first order" that will allow researchers to have instantaneous access to computational power from supercomputers from inside their own laboratories, now that networks are faster than the computers they connect.
[more]

11.10.2004
"HPCwire"
National LambdaRail to Go Above and Beyond

At SC2004, HPCwire editor Tim Curns interviewed keynoter Tom West, President and CEO of National LambdaRail, Inc., "a national effort comprised of members and associates from across the country focused on implementing and operating a national network infrastructure to serve the needs of the advanced research community." West mentioned the "dedicated 10 gigabit per second wavelength on the NLR infrastructure that the OptIPuter project is using to link facilities in Chicago and California." The OptIPuter project is led by Calit2 director Larry Smarr (see HPCwire interview with Smarr here.)      
[more]

11.9.2004
"PhysOrg.com"
Breakthrough in Coding Theory and Practice

The physics-oriented news site reports that that "IEEE Information Theory Society has selected an article by professor Alexander Vardy from the University of California, San Diego, and Ralf Koetter from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as the top publication in information theory during the past two years." Vardy is an academic participant in Calit2.  
[more]

11.8.2004
"Yahoo! News"
Platform Computing Launches Platform Rocks for Linux Cluster Market

At Supercomputing 2004, Platform Computing announced a powerful new software solution called Platform Rocks, a comprehensive cluster management toolkit that simplifies and speeds the deployment and management of small to large scale Linux clusters. The article quotes SDSC program director Phil Papadopoulos as saying, "We look forward to the contributions that Platform and their partners will make to the open source community at large and especially to the education market. This adds value to the National Science Foundation's funding investment in the Rocks core development at UCSD and should positively impact the science and engineering research community." Papadopoulos is co-PI on the Calit2-led OptIPuter project at UCSD.  
[more]

11.8.2004
"Punjab News"
Modern Multiples Produces Sixteen Pieces of Art Selected for 'Into The Pixel' Exhibition of Digital Art from Games

Celia Pearce, coordinator of Calit2's New Media Arts research, was a member of the 6-person jury that chose artwork to be displayed at “Into the Pixel.” The  computer and video game art will be exhibited at this year’s E3, a trade show for computer and video games and related products, scheduled May 13-14, at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
[more]

11.6.2004
"Buffalo News"
Buffalo seen as possible link with supercomputer network

Writer Fred Williams reports on Calit2 director Larry Smarr's speech at the University of Buffalo, quoting him as saying, "We're completely balkanized on our campuses... [Without the capacity to connect with far-flung data sources,] you've got to sit in your little science cave."
[more]

11.4.2004
"Yahoo! Finance"
DPAC Technologies Signs Industry/University Technology Development Agreement With Cal-IT2

This joint release issued over Businesswire details an agreement between Calit2 and DPAC Technologies, which will supply researchers and students with DPAC's Airborne(TM) Wireless LAN Node Module to serve as a base-enabling technology in development of first-response emergency management products and strategies being developed by Calit2.
[more]

11.2.2004
"Yahoo! News"
End-To-End 10 Gbps Wavelength Inaugurates New Optical Networking Infrastructure

A dedicated 3,200-mile wavelength linking Chicago and San Diego and dubbed the CAVEwave will support the NSF-funded and Calit2-led OptIPuter project. OptIPuter PI and institute director Larry Smarr is quoted saying "the OptIPuter team is excited to be an early adopter of NLR [National LambdaRail] and CAVEwave services."
[more]

11.2.2004
"EE Times"
Optical 'Pipeline' Opens Research Connections

The trade publication's Nicolas Mokhoff reports that the Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago "has acquired a dedicated 10 Gigabit 'pipe' on the National LambdaRail infrastructure from Chicago to the University of California, San Diego... The 3,200-mile wavelength, known as the CAVEwave, will initially tie to the OptIPuter project shared" between UIC and UCSD [led by Calit2 director Larry Smarr].
[more]

11.1.2004
"socaltech.com"
Broadcom Founder Establishes Research Prize at UC Irvine

Broadcom co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III established a $300,000 research prize to be administered through Calit2. The prize will promote collaboration among faculty.
[more]

10.29.2004
"Orange County Register"
Cyber Sociology:A UCI Researcher Looks into Lives Lived Online, and One Culture Revived

 Celia Pearce, Calit2 Irvine arts layer leader, investigates the ways in which societies evolve in the world of online gaming.
[more]

10.27.2004
"PC Magazine"
Modeling Internet Epidemics

Reporter John Quain from eWEEK writes that "a couple of recent National Science Foundation Cyber Trust research grant recipients are taking a naturalistic approach" to dealing with Internet plagues. One of the NSF projects "is the Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses, which received a $6.2 million NSF grant. It's led by Stefan Savage of the University of California at San Diego and Vern Paxson, chief scientist at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, California." Savage is affiliated with Calit2
[more]

10.26.2004
"Newsday"
Killer at the Cash Register

Celia Pearce, associate director of Calit2-Irvine division's Game Culture and Technology Lab, comments on the appeal of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, a new video game that hit shelves last week.
[more]

10.25.2004
"Orange County Register"
Tiny tubes may aid speed of PCs

UCI scientists have taken an important step in the quest for ever-more-powerful computers: creating the world’s longest electricity-conducting "nanotubes."
The nanotubes created by Peter Burke, UC Irvine assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and Calit2 academic participant, among others, are 0.4 centimeters long. But the filaments are only about 10 atoms wide, so narrow that they can’t be seen by the naked eye.
[more]

10.22.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
A Brainstorming Hub

As 30,000 people arrived in San Diego for the 34th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, science writer Bruce Lieberman highlights the advances made by San Diego researchers at UCSD as well as the Salk and Burnham institutes. The article highlights the work of UCSD School of Medicine professor Mark Ellisman, whose BIRN project is closely associated with Calit2, and quotes Ellisman as saying, "The challenge for us is putting all of those pieces in place – understanding how cells work as assemblies, and how those assemblies give rise to complex behavior... (That's) the basis for how the nervous system changes with experience, learning, memory and aging, and repairs itself or doesn't in the face of trauma or disease."

[more]

10.21.2004
"Slashdot"
30th Anniversary of Pascal

After contributor GrokSoup wrote that "UC San Diego is holding a public symposium on Friday, October 22nd, honoring the 30th anniversary of the Pascal programming language. Oh the memories of undergraduate bubble-sorts ...," the online discussion forum for techies received an avalanche of responses (nearly 600 in the first 24 hours). The symposium was co-sponsored by Calit2.
[more]

10.20.2004
"Orange County Register"
New UCI Art Exhibit Showcases Experimental Games You Can Play.

Alt+Ctrl, a festival of independent and alternative games, collected works from more than 20 digital artists and showcases them on computers and on the walls as giant, interactive displays. Some pieces are based on existing commercial game software, such as the Unreal engine. A few touch on political issues. One revolves around gay themes. Others put you in the middle of action, such as making you an Albanian embroiled in a centuries-old blood feud in "Medieval Unreality."
[more]

10.19.2004
"City News Service"
UCI Scientists Develop 'World's Longest' Electrically Conducting Nanotubes

Peter Burke, UCI assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and Calit2 faculty affiliate, helped synthesize the world's longest electrically conducting nanotube. The discovery has implications for supercomputer and health care applications. (Link not available at time of posting.)
[more]

10.18.2004
"Orange Couny Register"
OCTANe Fueling a Capital Idea

Irvine division Calit2 is partnering with the Orange County Technology Action Network – OCTANe for short  – on events that connect people and ideas, such as UCI’s meet-the-researcher series.
[more]

10.17.2004
"Orange County Register"
Dancing in the Dark

UCI dance professors and Calit2 faculty affiliates John Crawford and Lisa Naugle were instrumental in organizing UCI's first Dance Film Festival, which will be held Oct. 21-23, at the Irvine campus. The field of "dance on camera" is a growing art form, and the UCI dance department has been on the forefront of integrating technology with dance.
[more]

10.12.2004
"VNUnet"
SGI unveils high-spec Linux graphics workstation

In a report on SGI's announcement of its new Silicon Graphics Prism Linus workstations, the European technology news services quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as saying that "accelerating the pace of scientific discovery requires detailed insight into tera-scale data-sets that is greatly enabled through the scalability, power and bandwidth of Prism."    
[more]

10.11.2004
"PR Newswire"
SGI Introduces First Linux-Based High-Performance Visual Computing System

In a news release announcing the world's most powerful and flexible Linux(R) OS-based visual computer product line, SGI (formerly Silicon Graphics) reports that it has "taken its most advanced computer graphics capability, previously affordable to only a select few, and made it available on a truly open and accessible platform."  SGI -- an industry partner of Calit2 -- also quotes institute director and CSE professor Larry smarr as saying that "SGI's new system has the ability to deliver insight to disparate groups using Visual Area Networking, which enables the kind of inter-disciplinary collaboration that will result in unique breakthroughs."

[more]

10.8.2004
"United Press International"
Wireless World: WiFi transforms transport

Mobile, wireless technology is transforming transportation in Europe and America, according to UPI science writer Gene Koprowski, who notes that at "the University of California, San Diego, a broadband bus called the CyberShuttle uses an 802.11 wireless local-area network, to provide students and faculty the ability to be online, with notebook computers or PDAs while on the go around campus." The CyberShuttle was one of the first technologies developed under the aegis of Calit2, under the direction of UCSD division director Ramesh Rao.
[more]

10.7.2004
"Christian Science Monitor"
In cyberspace, a dark alliance

Technology writer Gregory Lamb reports on renewed efforts to battle worms, viruses and other Internet plagues, noting that "right now the criminals are on the offensive." He quotes CSE professor Stefan Savage as saying, "We're way behind... [Since 2001, there have been] incredible advances in sophistication on the part of the bad guys. And yet what we do to defend is pretty much what we did five years ago." Savage is leading a new Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses (CIED), which will collaborate with Calit2 on individual projects. The same article appeared in the Chicago Daily Herald and E-Commerce Times.
[more]

10.7.2004
"UCSD Guardian"
Three researchers named among top-100 young innovators by MIT magazine

Associate news editor Lisa Mak reports on the three UCSD scientists named to a list of the 100 top young innovators in the world compiled by MIT's Technology Review magazine. The three include computer science professor Serge Belongie, and the article notes that Calit2 has funded Belongie's Smart Vivarium project to date, which was cited as a major reason for the honor.
[more]

10.5.2004
"CIO Today"
Cyber Center Targets Internet Plagues

The technology news service's Mike Martin reports on NSF's funding of a new Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses (CIED), based at UCSD. He quotes the center's project director -- Jacobs School of Engineering professor Stefan Savage -- as saying the "very openness and efficiency that drove the Internet's success also make it an ideal breeding ground for infectious network agents." Savage is affiliated with Calit2, which will collaborate on projects with CIED researchers.
[more]

10.4.2004
"GridToday"
PRAGMA Puts People at Core of Cyberinfrastructure

The online grid-computing news service's Derrick Harris interviewed Peter Arzberger, chair of the PRAGMA steering committee and deputy layer leader at UCSD for Digitally Enabled Genomic Medicine, for a recap on the PRAGMA 7 Workshop that took place at the San Diego Supercomputer Center in September. The interview also highlights PRAGMA's links to Calit2, and the support of institute director Larry Smarr, who addressed the meeting.
[more]

10.4.2004
"Popular Science"
Henrik Jensen: A Hollywood ending for a comp-sci guy: his graphics software goes to the movies

In its October 2004 issue, the magazine publishes its latest "Brilliant 10" list of scientists under 40. Cited for his work in computer graphics, CSE professor Henrik Wann Jensen, 34, is one of the ten. His "ability to translate the play of light on surfaces into digital code has not only secured his status as an academic computer scientist;" exclaims writer Elizabeth Svoboda, "it has taken him on a red-carpet ride, earning him credits on films such as Terminator 3 and Shrek 2." 
[more]

10.4.2004
"Pittsburgh Post-Gazette"
CMU gets $6.4 million to boost computers' street savvy

Writer Byron Spice reports that while "Carnegie Mellon studies ways for computers to stay out of trouble, researchers at the University of California, San Diego, will receive $6.2 million of Cyber Trust money to study the epidemiology of the Internet, so computers can sense spreading infections and take actions to suppress them." The project is led by CSE professor and Calit2 participant Stefan Savage.
[more]

10.1.2004
"FreshNews.com"
Hooking Up Scientists to Ocean Sensors Leads List of NSF Information Technology Research Projects Awarded to UCSD

The online news service for the San Diego technology sector reports that UCSD researchers have been awarded more than $9 million from NSF's Information Technology Research program, with a Calit2 director as a principal investigator on the largest award of the year -- for the third year in a row.
[more]

10.1.2004
"KFMB-TV Channel 8"
UCSD Awarded $3.9M for Research Technology Development

The CBS affiliate reports that "the National Science Foundation awarded UC San Diego and the University of Washington $3.9 million Thursday to develop technology to link land-based researchers with ocean observatories off the West Coast." Calit2 director Larry Smarr is co-PI on the project.
[more]

9.30.2004
"Inter Press Service"
Designing Women Focus On Video Games

Most computer game players are male; in fact, fewer than 30 percent of those who play Nintendo and other computer video games are female, accoring to a 2000 industry report. Celia Pearce, a game designer and research manager for the Arts Layer at Calit2 at UC Irvine, says that even the bionic Lara Croft, the female action star of Tomb Raider, is not actually a role model for girls.

9.29.2004
"USA Today"
Young scientists prove 'Popular' with magazine

Reporter Sarah Hoflus profiles the "Brilliant 10" young scientists picked by Popular Science magazine in its October issue. They include 34-year-old CSE professor Henrik Wann Jensen, an academic participant in Calit2. The expert in computer graphics is cited for recognizing that "surfaces don't just reflect light, but absorb it. He has taken that absorption and translated it into digital code for graphics. His expertise was seen by audiences in Terminator 3, Shrek 2, the Lord of the Rings films and Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets."  
[more]

9.24.2004
"Internet Week"
NSF Awards $13 Million For Anti-Worm Research

The CMP publication's Gregg Keizer interviewed CSE professor Stefan Savage for this article on NSF's $6.2 million grant to fund the creation of the Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses (CIED), a joint venture of UCSD and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute that will collaborate with SDSC and Calit2. Keizer reports that "although the Center has the word "Epidemiology" in its title, Savage cautioned against comparing the research to medical examinations of biological infections. When the Center for Disease Control wants information about, say, the West Nile virus... it puts out a bunch of birds in cages to see if they get bit by mosquitoes. We're doing somewhat the same thing. As part of our research we'll emulate millions of hosts that we then put on the Internet to collect worms and viruses. But that's as far as the analogy goes." This article also appeared in TechWeb News.
[more]

9.24.2004
"TechWeb News"
NSF Awards $13 Million For Anti-Worm Research

The CMP publication's Gregg Keizer interviewed CSE professor Stefan Savage for this article on NSF's $6.2 million grant to fund the creation of the Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses (CIED), a joint venture of UCSD and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute that will collaborate with SDSC and Calit2. Keizer reports that "although the Center has the word "Epidemiology" in its title, Savage cautioned against comparing the research to medical examinations of biological infections. When the Center for Disease Control wants information about, say, the West Nile virus... it puts out a bunch of birds in cages to see if they get bit by mosquitoes. We're doing somewhat the same thing. As part of our research we'll emulate millions of hosts that we then put on the Internet to collect worms and viruses. But that's as far as the analogy goes."
[more]

9.23.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Physicist Schuller at UCSD honored

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports that UCSD physicist Ivan Schuller is one of seven scientists nationwide to receive the Department of Energy's highest honor, the E.O. Lawrence Award. Schuller, a materials scientist (who is also Calit2's layer leader at UCSD for Materials and Devices), is noted for creating the field of "metallic superlattices." The article also notes that Schuller is one of the 100 most cited physicists worldwide over the past 15 years. Similar articles appeared in: Contra Costa Times  and City News.
[more]

9.23.2004
"North County Times"
UCSD prof gets Department of Energy award

Quoting wire services, the newspaper reports that UCSD physicist Ivan Schuller has won the E.O. Lawrence Medal. Schuller is the Calit2 layer leader for Materials and Devices at UCSD.
[more]

9.22.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
UCSD to study 'epidemiology' of Internet viruses

Staff writer Kathryn Balint reports that computer scientists at UCSD are "taking a cue from the study of diseases in human populations," and were awarded a $6.2 million grant  yesterday to study the "epidemiology" of Internet viruses. CSE professor Stefan Savage, director of the new Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses (CIED) is quoted as saying unlike with medical epidemics, "on the Internet, you can transmit at incredible speeds... There's no limitation of geography. And the natural bulwarks that protect you in the animal kingdom don't apply to the Internet." CIED will collaborate with Calit2, in which Savage is an academic participant. Article also appeared in the German-based Innovations Report.
[more]

9.22.2004
"Reuters"
US Researchers Study Real Viruses to Thwart Virtual

Reporter Spencer Swartz writes that U.S. university researchers, including CSE professor and Calit2 participant Stefan Savage, will soon begin a multi-million-dollar  study of the spread of Internet viruses using methods pioneered in tracking the outbreak of human epidemics.  Savage is quoted as likening the study of the movement of Internet viruses to studying the spread of viruses like West Nile, a sometimes-deadly, mosquito-borne virus that infects humans: "We'll be focused on what vectors are used, just like in assessing West Nile, to spread computer viruses and ultimately try to develop defenses to prevent them from spreading." The story also appeared in India's Economic Times  (9/23) and New Zealand Herald (9/24).
[more]

9.22.2004
"San Diego Metropolitan"
Daily Business Report

The online San Diego news service reports that "computer scientists at UCSD and the International Computer Science Institute at UC Berkeley have joined forces to launch an assault on viruses, worms and other plagues afflicting the Internet. With $6.2 million in funding over five years from the National Science Foundation through its new Cyber Trust program, the scientists are to develop technologies to detect, analyze and defend against large-scale Internet attacks." 
[more]

9.21.2004
"San Diego Daily Transcript"
UCSD computer scientists awarded $6.2 million to study online epidemics

Technology writer Jennifer McEntee reports on the NSF-funded new Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses (CIED), led by CSE professor Stefan Savage, "to investigate Internet-borne viruses, worms and plagues." The center is a joint venture of UCSD and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute, and will collaborate with SDSC and Calit2. Savage is quoted as saying "industry has to implement a solution... [but] we're good at coming up with the seeds of those solutions." (UCSD readers can read the article in the campus e-News here.)  
[more]

9.20.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
MIT Honors Young UCSD Scientists

Science reporter Bruce Lieberman reports that three scientists at UCSD have been named among the world's 100 top young researchers by Technology Review, a national magazine published by MIT. Two of the three are affiliated with Calit2: CSE's Serge Belongie is one of the three UCSD researchers under 35 who made the list, together with chemist Jamie Link and Lei Wang, a postdoctoral researcher in the School of Pharmacology.

[more]

9.20.2004
"North County Times"
UCSD scientists named as top young researchers

The newspaper reports that three UCSD researchers made the MIT Technology
Review's list of the 100 Top Young Innovators in the world. Two of them are affiliated with Calit2: computer scientist Serge Belongie, who runs the institute's Smart Vivarium project; and chemist Jamie Link, a former Calit2 Graduate Fellow.
[more]

9.17.2004
"United Press International"
Wireless World: 'Fiction' of Telecom Rules

The news service's telecom writer Gene Koprowski argues that "the federal government's rules for telecom technology -- first written in the 1930s and revised about 10 years ago -- have not kept pace with dramatic technological changes." He highlights Wi-Fi service for commuters at UCSD, "called the Cyber Shuttle, which gives travelers access to high-speed Internet while they ride to and from campus." The Cyber Shuttle was developed by Calit2. The article appeared in Wireless News Factor.com and other publications.   
[more]

9.14.2004
"Wall Street Journal"
TV Pictures Will Keep Getting Better as Pixels Multiply, Web Advances

Portals columnist Lee Gomes reports on the latest advances in display technology, and interviewed University of Illinois at Chicago researcher Jason Leigh, a co-PI on the Calit2-led OptIPuter project. The article reports that Leigh expects video gamers "to play the same role in the display market, both in the den and in the living room" as they did in graphic advances on personal computers and game consoles.
[more]

8.30.2004
"New York Times"
A PC That Packs Real Power, and All Just for Me

Technology writer John Markoff reports on Orion Multisystems, a start-up company based in Santa Clara, Calif., will announced a new desktop workstation for engineers and scientists that the company hopes "will be able to deliver about 10 times the performance of a desktop personal computer." The article quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as saying "I don't think it's been demonstrated there's a huge need" for the workstation that contains 12 processors but consumers barely more than power than a PC. The article also appeared in the Aug. 30 issue of the International Herald Tribune.
[more]

8.27.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Mathematics: Building a Gold Medal Team

In an op-ed article about the importance of grooming top mathematicians, UCSD's dean of natural sciences Mark Thiemens notes that UCSD faculty have played important roles in the world of math. He notes that Hungarian-born mathematician Paul Erdos, whose "probabilistic combinatorics pioneered the way for major advancements in computer science, coding theory and the development of communications networks," spent the latter part of his life in "a room in the house of mathematicians Ronald Graham and Fan Chung Graham, now faculty members in UCSD's mathematics and computer science departments." Ron Graham is Calit2's Chief Scientist.
[more]

8.20.2004
"Science Magazine"
Stormy Forecast for Climate Science

Writer Andrew Lawler spoke with Calit2 director Larry Smarr for a report on NASA's Earth Observing System and what could be a "confused and perilous future" for climate researchers. Smarr is quoted as saying "the EOS program has been at the point of the spear... They've been pioneers." Smarr advises NASA on earth sciences.
[more]

8.15.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Mind Games

Reporter John Wilkens reports on the growing importance of studying videogames on college campuses, including UCSD. He quotes Calit2 New Media Arts layer leader Sheldon Brown as saying "whether we like it or not, this is the medium of our moment... It is a medium that is telling our cultural story, and the fact that it is a primary tool of youth and adolescents means it will have a tremendous impact on how the next generation or two plays itself out. It's not something we can ignore." Brown is a UCSD visual arts professor and director of the school's Center for Research in Computing and the Arts.
[more]

8.14.2004
"North County Times"
Palomar participating in telemedicine research study

 Andrea Moss reports on the addition of Escondido's Palomar Medical Center as a test site for long-distance diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke victims. It's part of the StrokeDoc program developed by the UCSD School of Medicine and Calit2, which developed the technology which permits the use of "high-resolution cameras, laptop computers and wireless technology to quickly link patients with acute stroke symptoms -- or those that began within the last three hours -- with neurologists who can determine whether the patients would benefit from time-sensitive treatments."

[more]

8.2.2004
"San Diego Business Journal"
UCSD Center Delves Into Computer Networks

Technology reporter Brad Graves reports on the launch of the Center for Networked Systems, part of Calit2. "Take a computer — even a high-powered supercomputer — and you have a system. Connect it with other systems and you have a network," writes Graves. "Computer scientists who specialize in systems have one more opportunity to talk shop with scientists who specialize in the data networks that link them. Four private companies have committed $9 million over three years to the Center for Networked Systems, a joint project between UC San Diego and industry. Companies contributing to the project are Qualcomm Inc., AT&T, Alcatel and Hewlett-Packard Corp."  
[more]

7.28.2004
"Fox6 News"
Fox CONNECT: Smart Airbags

In its weekly series on technologies developed in San Diego, Fox6 News' Jennifer Brant visited UCSD's Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles, and spoke with ECE professor Mohan Trivedi about a computer-vision system designed to modify the speed of an airbag deployment if the car detects that the passenger is a child, or a small woman, leaning forward. 
Length: 2:19  (Courtesy: Fox6 and UCSD CONNECT)
[Video]

7.24.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Firms Commit Millions to Fund Computer Networking Center

The newspaper reports that "four technology giants, including Qualcomm, are contributing $9 million over the next three years to a new center for computer networking at UCSD." It goes on to note that AT&T, Alcatel and Hewlett-Packard are also contributing to the university's Center for Networked Systems, an alliance between the university and the high-tech companies. CNS is part of both Calit2 and the Jacobs School of Engineering.  
[more]

7.24.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Firms Commit Millions to Fund Computer Networking Center

The newspaper reports that "four technology giants, including Qualcomm, are contributing $9 million over the next three years to a new center for computer networking at UCSD." It goes on to note that AT&T, Alcatel and Hewlett-Packard are also contributing to the university's Center for Networked Systems, an alliance between the university and the high-tech companies. CNS is part of both the Jacobs School and Calit2.
[more]

7.11.2004
"Chicago Tribune"
Video tools fight crime, but privacy is at issue

Technology reporter Jon Van reports on a $34 million project in Illinois to give public safety officers unprecedented video surveillance and communication capabilities. He quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as saying, "We're at a historic watershed in the notion of individual privacy... Video cameras in banks are useful in identifying criminals. But there's not enough public discussion of the minus side of this technology. The potential for abuse is sneaking up on us."
[more]

7.6.2004
"EOS Journal"
NASA Restructuring Draws Mixed Reactions

Writer Randy Showstack reports on NASA's planned restructuring, with comments from Calit2 director Larry Smarr, who is also chairman of NASA's Earth Systems Science and Applications Advisory Committee. Smarr is quoted as calling the restructuring a "strong endorsement" of earth science research.
[more]

7.5.2004
"IEEE Spectrum"
Sensors & Sensibility

In the July 2004 issue, writers Jean Kumagai and Steven Cherry report on how sensors are collecting personal information that could be misused. The cover story notes however that some scientists are finding ways to protect from such abuses, and highlights the work of UCSD electrical engineering professor and Calit2 layer leader Mohan Trivedi, noting that he has developed "a surveillance system that blocks out images of people and other objects; dedicated processors on the cameras represent them instead as colored cubes. If a camera detects suspicious activity - a person running down the street when everyone else is walking, or two cars crashing into each other on a highway - it will switch and reveal the true image. The cameras are also arranged in an array, so that the system knows what it's tracking as objects or people move from one camera to the next - a skill not shared by the vast majority of the world's 31 million surveillance cameras."
[more]

7.4.2004
"Contra Costa Times"
Early Sierra Melt Brings Concern

The snowmelt in the Sierras started in mid-March, in what appears to be one of the earliest onsets of the melt in almost 90 years, and Steve Hymon of the Los Angeles Times reports that some scientists suspect it is another sign that climate change is eroding the Sierra Nevada snowpack, the state's main source of water. He quotes Scripps Institution of Oceanography researcher Jessica Lundquist as saying in mid-June that "this is not what you would expect to see in June. This is very low. This is a July measurement." Lundquist, a graduate student at SIO, is a Calit2 Fellow.
[more]

7.2.2004
"Science Magazine"
NASA: Will New Lineup Transform or Deform Science?

Writer Andrew Lawler reports on NASA's "biggest organizational change in more than a decade." He reports that "though some earth scientists fear becoming second-class citizens in the new office, others are more optimistic," and goes on to quote Calit2 director Larry Smarr, chair of NASA's earth sciences advisory panel, as saying that he has "been arguing that earth and space science need to be closer."
[more]

6.28.2004
"Tampa Tribune"
They're Paid to Play

Serious gamers have an expertise that is needed in today's digital society. Celia Pearce, who studies video-game culture for UC Irvine's Calit2 Game Culture and Technology Lab, countered the perception that hard-core video-game players are underachieving teens who shun exercise and homework.
[more]

6.24.2004
"Newsfactor Innovation"
Mini Transistors May Give Microprocessors a Maxi Boost

Tiny transistors could speed cell phones and computers in a big way, says a computer-science researcher at University of California, Irvine (UCI). UCI's Peter Burke, a Cal-IT academic participant, has shown for the first time that transistors made from single-walled carbon tubes only a few nanometers wide operate at extremely fast microwave frequencies. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter or about 1,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair.
[more]

6.21.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
No strings attached

Personal technology reporter Jonathan Sidener reports on development of WiMax and ultra wideband (UWB) technologies that will eventually do away with wires in the home and beyond. He quotes UCSD professor and Calit2 participant Laurence Milstein as saying that "one of the significant aspects of UWB is that it creates an opportunity for consumer applications using a portion of the radio spectrum that the Federal Communications Commission has already licensed for other purposes, including the Global Positioning System... [assuming that] the question of interference is one of several technical hurdles that must be overcome before UWB is ready for the marketplace."
[more]

6.21.2004
"The Chronicle of Higher Education"
UCI Chancellor Nominated to be Next President of National Academy of Sciences

The governing council of the National Academy of Sciences has nominated Ralph J. Cicerone, chancellor of the University of California at Irvine and Calit2 Co-PI, and an expert on climate change and ozone, to be the academy's president beginning in July 2005.

If approved by the academy's members, he would succeed Bruce Alberts, whose second six-year term ends next summer. A nominating committee of 28 members selected Mr. Cicerone after a six-month search. The academy's 2,000 members, most of whom are in academe, will be asked to ratify the nomination in balloting to be held in December and January. Under the academy's rules, Mr. Cicerone will be the sole candidate. Additional nominations are allowed, but none have been made in previous elections.
[more]

6.18.2004
"The Financial Times"
Science Acadamey Appoints New Chief

The U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the world's most important scientific society, has chosen Ralph Cicerone, a leading atmospheric chemist and expert on global warming, to be its next president. He will succeed Bruce Alberts whose second six-year term as NAS president ends in July 2005. Prof Cicerone has been chancellor of the University of California's Irvine campus since 1998 and serves as the Co-PI for Calit2. He has won plaudits for expanding UC Irvine and improving the quality of its research, in the face of cuts in state funding that have undermined academic life at other UC campuses. The Washington-based NAS and its affiliate, the National Research Council, are large and influential, producing 250 reports a year.
[more]

6.17.2004
"Irvine World News"
UCI Start-up Conference Attracts Faculty and Business Community

The Life Science Start-Ups Conference held Friday, June 11, at the University of California at Irvine attracted a number of faculty members, as well as those from the business community wanting to pursue new business ventures founded on UCI life sciences technologies.

According to Dave Schetter, assistant vice chancellor of Research and Technology Alliances at UCI and Calit2 academic participant, the conference was just the start of things to come. He said that start-up companies founded on UCI technologies have become an important vehicle for technology commercialization and particularly for local economic development. Under a UC Discovery Grant Opportunity Award, UCI is launching a pilot program to expand campus efforts in this area called the Life Science Start-Up Company Development Initiative.
[more]

6.16.2004
"Orange County Register"
I Couldn't Turn It Down

Over the years, in ways subtle and direct, Ralph Cicerone, UCI Chancellor and Calit2 Co-PI, has been courted by a half dozen of the nation's top-drawer universities, schools such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Michigan that were searching for an eminent scholar to fill a leadership post.

Cicerone never really had the heart to go, preferring to remain chancellor of a campus he speaks of with the sort of affection most people use to describe their first great love. The love affair isn't dead. But it appears that Cicerone is leaving UCI in a change that will burnish the school's reputation.
[more]

6.16.2004
"Los Angeles Times"
UCI Chancellor to Join Scientific High Society

  Ralph Cicerone, UC Irvine chancellor, a leading environmental scientist and Calit2 Co-Principal Investigator, will leave his post at the end of the next school year and is all but certain to become president of the prestigious National Academy of Sciences.

As chief of the fast-growing Orange County campus for six years, Cicerone is credited with continuing the university's steady climb through the nation's academic ranks in the midst of a state fiscal crisis. "This is a huge and different opportunity to do some things I am excited about and that can make a difference." Cicerone said Tuesday. "I am going to miss UCI, but I am excited for the challenge."
[more]

6.11.2004
"Yahoo! Finance"
DPAC Wins ``Best of Show'' Product Award at Sensors Expo in Detroit

In a news release, DPAC Technologies noted that at the Sensors Expo in Detroit, apart from winning an award for its own technology, the company also demonstrated "a wireless medical pulse oximeter developed by Cal-IT2, a research and development arm of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), funded by UCSD and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) in partnership with the National Science Foundation."
[more]

6.8.2004
"IEEE Design & Test of Computers"
The next EDA challenge: Design for manufacturability

CSE professor Rajesh Gupta argues in favor of a "complete overhaul of the design flow. Such an overhaul must include reliability and manufacturing concerns as an integral part of the design agenda, and incorporate the support of tools, throughout the design process." Gupta is the publication's Editor in Chief, and his comments are in the May-June issue.

6.7.2004
"New York Times"
Use of Bacteria in Art Leads to Federal Inquiry

A member of the collective, Beatriz da Costa, an art professor at UC Irvine and a Calit2 New Media Arts academic participant, said she was leaving her hotel to attend an art show in North Adams, Mass., last Sunday when a stranger called out to her. "I heard someone say my name," she said. "I turned around and an F.B.I. agent was there and served me with the subpoena." She was summoned to appear before a federal grand jury in Buffalo on June 15.
Ensemble members heard reports that F.B.I. agents had questioned museum curators and administrators at university art departments with connections to the group. The group produces Web sites, books and touring shows and orchestrates 1960's-style "happenings," aimed at showing the impact of technology and its representation on modern life.  
[more]

6.7.2004
"Newsweek"
The Wireless World

In a survey of major wireless cities in U.S., the magazine highlights San Diego, noting that "if wireless technology has a birthplace, it's San Diego." It notes that in 1968, UCSD engineering professor Irwin Jacobs "founded a company called Linkabit to create the world's first digital wireless-communications network. Today, spinoffs like Qualcomm and Leap Wireless, as well as the U.S. branches of international giants like Nokia and Sony Electronics, populate the region. A special program at UCSD even offers a degree in wireless communications."
[more]

6.7.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Super audio: The next wave of digital sound will be in high definition

Personal technology reporter Jonathan Sidener reports on the advent of high-definition audio, and quotes UCSD music professor Peter Otto as saying, "the most interesting thing about HD audio is the idea of music recorded for and played back in high-definition surround sound." Otto is part of UCSD's Center for Research in Computing and the Arts and is closely involved in the development of new audio research labs for the Calit2 building.

[more]

6.3.2004
"Los Angeles Times"
Big Donor Is Donald Bren, UC Irvine Says

UC Irvine officials on Wednesday identified Irvine Co. Chief Executive Donald Bren as the anonymous donor who gave $20 million to UC Irvine's School of Information and Computer Science in December.
[more]

6.3.2004
"The Orange County Register"
A concrete thank you

UCI said Wednesday that its fast-growing computer school has been named the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Science. And the $50.6 million research and office complex the school will break ground on next Wednesday will be called Bren Hall.
[more]

6.3.2004
"Irvine World News"
UCI School of Information and Computer Science Named in Honor of Donald Bren

UC Irvine's School of Information and Computer Science (ICS) will celebrate a new name, the promise of a new home, the generosity of its major benefactor and the appointment of its first dean Wednesday at a campus ceremony for supporters and invited civic, business and political leaders. Donald Bren made a $20 million gift to ICS in December that equaled the largest gift ever to UCI.
The event is not open to the public.
[more]

6.3.2004
"Daily Pilot"
Buildings filling to the Bren at UC Irvine

A big donation and a passed bond initiative are giving the nationally ranked School of Information and Computer Science a new name: The Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences. "It all came together, not quite simultaneously, but we had an amazing year - becoming a school, the bonds getting passed, getting the gift," Dean [Debra] Richardson said. "This is really a transformational gift."
[more]

5.31.2004
"Crain's Cleveland Business"
Gaming a Virtual Reality at Case

UCI MENTIONED:    Within the next few months, an engineering student doing homework might face a tough choice: Should he or she use a Microsoft Xbox or a Sony PlayStation2? CWRU has awarded a $375,000 Provost's Opportunity Fund grant to its Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department to set up a new Virtual Worlds laboratory. The idea of the lab is to help students learn how to write software programs for computer games and virtual reality simulations and how to refine gaming hardware.

Virtual reality and gaming laboratories exist at schools that include the University of California at Irvine s Calit2 Game Culture and Technology Lab, the University of Michigan and the University of Buffalo.

Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh has developed an Entertainment Technology Center that offers a master's degree in entertainment technology, which is conferred jointly by the university's College of Fine Arts and the School of Computer Science. The web site for Carnegie Mellon's center states that other U.S. schools with similar programs include Georgia Tech, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Florida and the University of Southern California.
[more]

5.26.2004
"Orange County Register"
Girls Just Want to Have Fun

Observers say the game industry is changing to include demographics far beyond teenage boys. "The Sims" introduced a virtual world full of ordinary characters and captured a 60 percent female audience, according to its publisher, Electronic Arts in Redwood City. But the process has been slow, said Celia Pearce, associate director of Cal (IT)²'s Game Culture and Technology Lab at the Universityof California, Irvine. 
[more]

5.21.2004
"Science Magazine"
Number Theory: Proof Promises Progress in Prime Progressions

Writer Barry Cipra reports on "a stunning breakthrough in the theory of prime numbers" by Ben Green and Terence Tao, who proved that an infinite number of arithmetic progressions of prime with four terms (until now, it was only proved with three terms.) The article quotes Calit2  chief scientist Ronald Graham as saying the mathematicians' complicated 50-page proof is "just amazing... It's such a big jump from what came before."  
[more]

5.20.2004
"@UCSD"
Making Nice with Mice

A 200-word summary of the Smart Vivarium project led by CSE professor, Serge Belongie. 
[more]

5.20.2004
"The Toronto Star"
E to the Power of 3

As video games become ever more part of mainstream society, an increasing number of schools are offering video games studies as part of the curriculum. That means more students are going home and playing games as part of their homework. Most of the schools group them with the computer science or engineering degrees, so you slackers out there best start brushing up on your mathematics. Princeton, CarnegieMellonUniversity, M.I.T. and the Universityof Californiaat Irvineall offer classes in video game studies.  

*Not online*

5.19.2004
"Scientific American"
Security at Your Fingertips

In the magazine's June 2004 issue, Mark Alpert writes about fingerprint recognition technologies and mentions Digital Persona, a company co-founded by Serge Belongie, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at UCSD and an academic participant in Calit2.

**Not online**  

5.17.2004
"Orange County Business Journal"
Nicholas Pulls No Punches as Guest Lecturer at UCI

Top tech executive, Henry Nicholas, was a guest lecturer in at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering. He told a group of 25 engineering and other students to go after the biggest markets and competitors.
[more]

5.16.2004
"Orange County Register"
High-tech Caregiving Offers a Wealth of Promise and Savings

Eric Dishman talks about technology for virtual caregiving at the recent Alzheimer's disease conference sponsored by the Orange County Alzheimer's Association and the Universityof California, Irvine.  
[more]

5.12.2004
"CNN.com"
Colleges offering video game studies

The new program is one of many at major universities across the country. The Universityof Southern California recently announced a partnership with the world's largest video game publisher, Electronic Arts, to create a program in video game design that will offer a master's degree in fine arts. Other institutions offering classes in video game studies include Princeton, Carnegie Mellon University, Massachusetts Institution of Technology, and the Universityof California, Irvine. There are also specialized schools, like DigiPen in Redmond, Washington, that teach nothing but game design.  
[more]

5.12.2004
"Daily Pilot"
Students who can't hack it should study

It would take someone with extensive computer knowledge to get around typical security precautions in a school's computer system, said Kenneth Kraemer, director of information systems at UC Irvine's Graduate School of Management. Some students have a natural knack for computer hacking, while others pick it up from family and friends, or from online chats with other hackers.  
[more]

5.7.2004
"InnovationMexico.com"
Mexican science and technology dignitaries stretch collaboration ties with California institute

The Mexican National Council for Science and Technology's website reported on a delegation of 30 Mexican representatives from science and technology organizations and private companies that attended Calit2's All-hands Meeting in April at UCSD. According to Carlos Duarte, Director of the Office of CONACyT in the USA, the "visit was the culmination of a series of meetings held previously in Mexico and the U.S. with the purpose of identifying projects of mutual interest as the basis for more long-range collaboration between the two countries." 
[more]

5.6.2004
"BBC News"
Virtual skin looking even better

Reporting for the BBC's online edition, Alfred Hermida reports on a new technique for simulating the effect of light on skin, and interviewed Calit2 participant and UCSD computer science professor Henrik Wann Jensen for the profile. Jensen is quoted as saying the technique "is being used in almost all visual effects for movies and there are a number of game companies looking at how to adapt the technique for games as well."
[more]

5.6.2004
"The Orange County Register"
UCI Engineering Instructor Honored

UCI MENTIONED: Jia Grace Lu, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of California, Irvine, has been named one of the nation's most promising young scientists and engineers by the Bush administration. Lu, who works in the field of spin electronics, was selected along with 56 other researchers to receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The awards were conferred Monday at the White House by John Marburger III, the president's science adviser. Lu, 35, has "advanced the frontiers of knowledge in spin electronics, considered to be the defining concept of 21st-century electronics," the administration said. "Her work combines concepts in faster, more-reliable electronics (and) nanotechnology."
[more]

5.5.2004
"University of Chicago Magazine"
Father of the Grid

In the magazine's April issue, Amy Braverman profiles distributed computing and Grid pioneer Ian Foster, director of the Distributed Systems Lab at Argonne National Laboratory. The article goes on to quote Calit2 director Larry Smarr as dubbing a landmark 1995 supercomputing conference "the Woodstock of the Grid." Also mentioned in the profile: Smarr's co-PI on the OptIPuter project, Thomas A. DeFanti, director of the University of Illinois–Chicago’s Electronic Visualization Lab. 
[more]

5.3.2004
"Podium Press"
Broadcom Co-FounderEstablishes Research Competition at UCI

Dr. Henry T. Nicholas III, co-founder and retired co-chairman and CEO of Broadcom Corp., has established a $300,000 prize competition, to be administered by the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), which will promote collaboration among UCI`s faculty. The Nicholas Foundation Prize for Cross-Disciplinary Research will recognize ''high-risk/high-yield'' pilot research investigations that are relevant to Calit2`s mission and hold potential for leading to further discoveries or large-scale extramural funding.
[more]

4.27.2004
"United Press International"
Nanotransistors Promise Super Speed

Researchers at the Universityof California, Irvine, said the new technology could lead to better cell phones and much faster computers -- perhaps as much as 1,000 times faster. "Since the invention of nanotube transistors, there have been theoretical predictions that they can operate very fast," said Peter Burke, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science and lead researcher. "Our work is the first to show that single-walled nanotube transistor devices can indeed function at very high speeds."

4.27.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Paperless prescriptions on horizon

In an article subtitled "Doctors to transmit orders via computer," writer Leslie Berestein report that the San Diego County Medical Society Foundation "has been working to devise a way for medical institutions to exchange patient information electronically within five years." The foundation notes that "it is working with the county health department and the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology at the University of California in San Diego and Irvine."
[more]

4.26.2004
"Cox Channel 4"
Homeland Security in San Diego

For a wide-ranging report on efforts at San Diego universities to work on homeland security issues, the program San Diego Insider interviewed San Diego State University professor Eric Frost about his university's new Master's degree program in homeland security. Frost is an active participant in Calit2. Also interviewed: Frieder Seible, dean of UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering, and co-chair of Calit2's governing board, about UCSD's new blast simulation facility at Camp Elliott.
*To view this .mpg file requires Windows Media Player, Quicktime or RealOne Player. [Video]

4.20.2004
"San Diego Metropolitan"
Entree Wireless and Calit2

The magazine's online daily report reports that the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology will deploy Entree Wireless's technology solution to provide high-speed wireless connectivity in the field for first responders in disaster situations, and quotes UCSD division director Ramesh Rao as saying "these mobile gateways will be a cornerstone of the communications networks we are developing for homeland security and other purposes." 
[more]

4.20.2004
"San Diego Magazine"
WiFi/3G Gateway Makes Commercial Entree

The magazine's online service reports that "startup Entree Wireless has its first customer -- the same outfit that spawned the its fundamental technology. The California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, or Cal(IT)², will use Entree's MANPack mobile wireless gateway to deploy high-speed wireless Internet access for first responders in disaster situations. Financial details were not disclosed."   
[more]

4.19.2004
"WirelessIQ"
Entree, Cal-IT Deploy Security Solution

The online news service reports on a deal whereby Entree Wireless, a leading developer of Mobile Wireless Gateways, will supply is mobile WiFi access gateways to a project at UCSD to improve communications for medical first responders in a crisis situation. Same article appears in 3GNewsroom.com at http://www.3gnewsroom.com/3g_news
/apr_04/news_4412.shtml

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4.13.2004
"The Times Union (Albany)"
At RPI, games aren't kid stuff

UCI MENTIONED: RPI expects 100 students to enroll in the minor during its first year. It's not alone in this new field of "arcademia." Last month, Princeton held a session on video game studies. Carnegie Mellon University, Southern Methodist University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California at Irvine are among the schools offering programs or courses in game design.
First Paragraph: Students taking Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's latest minor, in video-game studies, won't have to pay their tuition in quarters. And Tetris is not a prerequisite. Game Studies is serious stuff. As video games become a major industry and a part of more than just prepubescent lives, they are also earning a home within academia.

4.12.2004
"San Diego Metropolitan"
Daily Business Report

The monthly magazine's April 12 online edition reports that Calit2's division director at UCSD, Ramesh Rao, "has been appointed the first holder of the Qualcomm Endowed Chair in Telecommunications and Information Technologies in the university's Jacobs School of Engineering," where he is a professor of electrical and computer engineering. QUALCOMM CEO Irwin Jacobs is quoted as saying "engineering students do benefit greatly from interaction with noted faculty, such as Professor Rao, who have achieved distinguished careers in theory and in applied technology. We are pleased to support Professor Rao's commitment to make UCSD an even stronger source of world-class technology leaders." 
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3.31.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Report: State climbs in high-tech rankings

Staff writer Dean Calbreath reports on a new survey of California's competitiveness as a high-tech center, and quotes San Diego Telecom Council executive director Julia Wilson as pointing to breakthroughs on university campuses, noting that "at UC San Diego, there's a new $400 million center for wireless education" -- an apparent reference to the state-and-industry funded California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology. The new Milken Survey places California second after Massachusetts as a high-tech center. 
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3.29.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
UCSD engineers to lead project

In its March 26 edition, the newspaper's Business Briefing column reports that UCSD engineers "will lead a six-university effort to help the Army adopt the use of lightweight wireless equipment in setting up mobile communications networks on the battlefield. The project will receive approximately $3 million in Pentagon funding over three years, with an option to extend funding to $5.25 million over five years." Some of the research will be carried out by Calit2-affiliated researchers at both UCSD and UC Irvine.
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3.26.2004
"Los Angeles Times"
Actions Morphs Into Art

Three decades after "Pong" ricocheted into popular culture, video games are bouncing into the rarefied world of fine art. A vocal clique of academics, curators and critics is asking whether digital muscleman Duke Nukem deserves the same study and reverence as, say, a Degas sculpture. But if art is, as novelist Leo Tolstoy once observed, the passing of an experience from one person to another, "Return to Castle Wolfenstein" cannot so easily be dismissed as simple engineering. Celia Pearce, an instructor of game design and Calit2 new media arts layer researcher at UCI, found the game so engrossing that it drowned out the Friday afternoon hum outside her Venice loft. Pearce navigated the game's gothic dungeons on her custom-built laptop giving her insight which included her quote from a graphics perspective, I think this is beautiful.
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3.11.2004
"Irvine World News"
Bartenders know more about you than you think

Regarding Swipe's demonstration of data mining, Celia Pearce, research and external relations manager for Calit2 at UCI is quoted as saying, "One of the things that I like about this is that it's using technology in a very compelling way to look at something that is very everyday that people take for granted," she said. "This data mining phenomenon that is being done by corporations is happening all the time and most people aren't aware of it, meanwhile, everyone is freaking out about the government and the Patriot Act and privacy. But corporations have pretty much unlimited access to us."
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3.10.2004
"89.3 KPCC"
'Swipe' Exhibit Highlights Our Lack of Privacy

A performance art piece at UC Irvine shows how much of our personal information is publicly available -- just with the swipe of our driver's license.
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3.6.2004
"The Feature.com"
Putting Wireless to the Test(bed)

David Pescowitz reports in the online news service on the $5.5 million, NSF-funded project called WHYNET, which includes UCSD and four other UC schools, linking together their wireless testbeds into a "meta-testbed." Calit2 division director Ramesh Rao is quoted saying that "the point of WHYNET is to enable users to go across a single federated testbed and get access to all of the unique capabilities of the various campuses." The article notes that at UCSD, "researchers there have demonstrated cellular-based tele-medicine systems that enable physicians to diagnose stroke patients remotely via mobile audiovisual links." 
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3.4.2004
"National Academies"
National Academy of Sciences Elects Treasurer and Councilors

In a news release, the National Academies announced in Washington, D. C. that the National Academy of Sciences has elected "Ronald L. Graham, Irwin and Joan Jacobs Professor of Computer and Information Science, University of California, San Diego... to a third term as the Academy's treasurer. During his four-year term beginning July 1, 2004, he will continue to be responsible for financial oversight of the Academy and the National Research Council." Graham is also Calit2's Chief Scientist.   
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3.3.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
On tap: a 10,000-volt view of deep oceans

Columnist Neil Morgan writes that the NSF has asked Congress for $200 million to establish Project ORION (Ocean Research Interactive Observatory Network), a network of fiber-optic observatories on the ocean floors. The article quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as saying we "watch America's research vehicle maneuver on the surface of Mars, a hundred or two million miles away. But we know far too little about our oceans, which make up two-thirds of Earth and are our last great unknown." SIO director John Orcutt, who leads the project, is also mentioned. 
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2.25.2004
"Technology Review"
Wearable Devices Add Strength

In the February issue of "Technology Review" magazine, Maria Feng, layer leader of Environment and Civil Infrastructure at UCI, is cited as a leader in wearable MEMS technology. 
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2.19.2004
"Medical Research Law & Policy Report"
Inventors Say Automated Cage Monitoring Promises Better Lab Results, Animal Care

According to this Bureau of National Affairs publication, UCSD recently announced that it is developing a system to monitor rats, mice, and other lab animals automatically. "Instead of human eyes, a camera connected to a computer monitors the cages. Pattern recognition software enables the computer to track each animal and monitor its behavior," writes Alexander Otto, about the system dubbed a "Smart Vivarium." Jacobs School computer science professor Serge Belongie, who is leading the Calit2 project, is quoted as saying that "being able to track several animals in the same cage--as opposed a single animal in a single cage--is [new]." 
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2.17.2004
"Reuters"
Hollywood Honours Its Geeks

In a report from Los Angeles reprinted by CNN and other outlets, the news service reported that actress Jennifer Garner "proved her range as actress when a Hollywood audience got to hear the star of ABC's spy drama "Alias" expound on the merits of subsurface light scattering in translucent materials" -- a computer-graphics technology pioneered by UCSD professor Henrik Wann Jensen, an academic participant in Calit2. The article noted that the technology "has been used to make more realistic-looking skin on digital film characters."   
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2.10.2004
"Wired News"
Cool New Ideas to Save Brains

San Diego-based Randy Dotinga reports on the International Stroke Conference held recently, and notes that "researchers from the University of California at San Diego unveiled an Internet-based system to help emergency rooms get expert advice... American doctors have been experimenting with ways to allow faraway doctors to see test results and examine stroke patients through video and computer links. According to a study of the online diagnoses of 25 patients, the Internet link allowed doctors to boost the number of patients given tPA." The StrokeDoc system was co-developed by researchers at the Jacobs School and Calit2. 
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1.26.2004
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Virtual Pilots

Jan. 25-Helena Bristow typically spends more than two hours a day commuting from her home in Vista to her job at UCSD. So she leapt at the chance when the engineers at work asked her if she wanted to test a free, personalized traffic information service. The traffic-report system, now available to the public at http://traffic.calit2.net, puts San Diego on the cutting edge of mobile traffic directions, part of a growing field known as telematics, which involves technology to help drivers. Engineers at Calit2, the University of California, San Diego-based California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, say theirs is the only such system offering customized traffic reports. 
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1.16.2004
"@UCSD"
Distant Diagnosis

In the inaugural January 2004 edition of a new quarterly magazine published by the UCSD Alumni Association, writer Christopher Vaughn reports on the StrokeDoc project, calling it "a marriage of medicine, computer science and cellular technology [that] brings new hope to stroke victims. The Jacobs School's principal investigator on the project -- ECE professor and Calit2 division director Ramesh Rao -- is quoted as saying "the features and the quality of the system that the physicians were asking for turned out to be quite demanding." 
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1.5.2004
"Electronic Engineering Times"
Between Rock, Hard Place

In the Dec. 22 edition, Ron Wilson reports that "static timing analysis is one of the pilings upon which the whole edifice of modern IC [integrated circuit] design has been erected," but that the assumptions on which the technique is based "may no longer hold water." Jacobs School computer science professor and Calit2 academic participant Andrew Kahng is quoted extensively in the article. 
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