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February 23, 2017
UC San Diego Organizes 2017 Workshop on Big Data and the Earth Sciences

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12.28.2005
"The Boston Globe"
SJC Bars a Type of Prints at Trial

The Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts rejected a particular type of fingerprint evidence in a murder trial. Simon Cole, UCI assistant professor of criminology, law and society and a Calit2 academic participant, signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the court to reject fingerprint analysis until it is proven reliable through rigorous scientific scrutiny.
[more]

12.28.2005
"United Press International"
Massachusetts Court Rejects Fingerprint Evidence

University of California, Irvine criminology expert Simon Cole said it was the second time that a U.S. court has found fingerprint evidence unreliable.
[more]

12.25.2005
"Associated Press"
Boston Police to Reopen Fingerprint Lab After Overhaul

Simon Cole, a professor of criminology at the University of California, Irvine, who has been critical of fingerprint analysis, praised the Boston Police Department's decision to hire civilians.
[more]

12.19.2005
"New York Times"
Social Commentary, or Just a Dog's Opinion?

Writer Tom Zeller reports on a "subversive" plea for file sharing in a new videogame produced by Nintendo. The article quotes CRCA director and Calit2 new-media arts leader Sheldon Brown on the videogame industry: "Whether we like it or not, this is the medium of our moment. It is a medium that is telling our cultural story, and the fact that it is a primary tool of youth and adolescents means it will have a tremendous impact on how the next generation or two plays itself out."
[more]

12.19.2005
"Forefront"
CITRIS joins Indian university in e-learning initiative

The news item in UC Berkeley's quarterly magazine notes that Calit2's sister institute CITRIS participated in the launch of a new distance-learning initiative between India and several U.S. universities led by UCSD and Calit2.
[more]

12.16.2005
"Wireless Gaming World"
Sowing the Seeds

Glu Mobile, one of the industry’s leading mobile game publishers, sponsored a game development class in the Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UCI.
[more]

12.15.2005
"Irvine World News"
Faulty Fingerprints Debunk Forensic Science 'Zero Error' Claim

A UC Irvine study led by Assistant Professor Simon Cole suggests that there could be as many as 1,900 mistaken fingerprint matches each year by U.S. crime laboratories.
[more]

12.12.2005
"Wired"
Monsters of Photorealism

Writer Clive Thompson reports on the difficulty of portraying realistic humans in videogames, and quotes Jacobs School computer graphics expert Henrik Wann Jensen.
[more]

12.12.2005
"CNET News"
Innovations battle natural calamities

Stefanie Olsen reports on efforts at UCSD and partner institutions to use high-speed telecom technology for Earth science research, quoting Scripps deputy director and Calit2 participant John Orcutt.
[more]

12.11.2005
"IT News Online"
Universities in U.S., India Team for Satellite e-Learning Program

The online news service reports on the latest distance-learing agreement between UCSD and other U.S. universities and India's Amrita University, announced last week in New Delhi.

[more]

12.10.2005
"OC Register"
UCI Gamers Going Mobile

Thirty UCI undergraduate students who had just completed a mobile game development class showcased their creations for other students, professors and corporate representatives.
[more]

11.29.2005
"CONNECT Newsletter"
Ericsson Endows UCSD Chair in Wireless Communication

The San Diego online technology e-zine reports on the creation of a chair in "wireless communication access techniques" by Ericsson through Calit2 for Jacobs School of Engineering professor Laurence Milstein at UCSD.
[more]

11.29.2005
"CONNECT Newsletter"
Researchers Hub: Cahit Akin

Editor Andrea Siedsma profiles Calit2 researcher Cahit Akin, who recently co-founded Mushroom Networks, a spinout of UCSD technology "that enables sharing of Internet access resources over local ad-hoc networks."
[more]

11.28.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Seeing the art in computer games

Arts writer James Hebert profiles the work of Alex Dragulescu, who "creates art from electronic data." Dragulescu is a long-time participant in Calit2 as a graduate student and currently  manages the Experimental Game Lab of CRCA for Calit2 at UCSD.

[more]

11.28.2005
"UCSD Guardian"
Atkinson a hall without walls

News editor Charles Nguyen reports on the new Calit2 building at UCSD, describing it as a "free-form facility...[that] propels innovation across disciplines." Calit2 director of communications Stephanie Sides and principal development engineer Greg Dawe are quoted.
[more]

11.22.2005
"San Diego Tribune"
Taking an educated GEOSS at nature

Imagine the ability to better forecast winter El Niños and summer heat waves, estimate where an earthquake might strike next, pinpoint where an oil spill will foul beaches and predict a wildfire's reach with unprecedented precision.
[more]

11.17.2005
"Int ernet2 News"
Super Network Supports Supercomputing 2005

In a report from SC05, Jan Eveleth quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as saying that the "Terabit Era has arrived! This unprecedented achievement of PNWGP and SC|05 demonstrates that the United States needs to broaden its strategic technology leadership agenda from a focus on faster individual supercomputers to supernetwork-connected resources on a global scale."

[more]

11.16.2005
"San Diego Daily Transcript"
Ericsson to Underwrite UCSD Chair

Telecommunications firm Ericsson will fund an endowed chair in wireless communications at UCSD, the school announced Wednesday. The chair for Laurence Milstein was committed as part of Ericsson's partnership with Calit2.
[more]

11.16.2005
"San Diego Business Journal"
Ericsson Funds University Chair

Technology reporter Brad Graves reports that "Ericsson, the $16 billion telecommunications company based in Sweden, has endowed a professorship at UC San Diego" for CDMA expert and Calit2 participant Laurence Milstein.
[more]

11.16.2005
"Symmetry"
Sciences on the Grid

Writer Katie Yurkewicz reports on a series of projects that are pushing the limits of grid computing, including the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) based at UCSD and led by Calit2 participant Mark Ellisman, as well as the NEES earthquake testing program, whose cyberinfrastructure offices will be housed in the new Calit2 building at UCSD.
[more]

11.15.2005
"New York Times"
Microsoft Enters the High-Performance Computing Fray

Technology correspondent John Markoff reports on a move by Microsoft to supply software for scientific cluster computing and cites SDSC/Calit2 research scientist Philip Papadopoulos as saying that "to move into the scientific and technical computing world, Microsoft will have to overcome several obstacles," including making its software work in what is traditionally a Unix environment.
[more]

11.12.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Supercomputing now indispensable

In a feature on the 20th anniversary of the San Diego Supercomputer Center, technology reporter Bruce Lieberman quotes SDSC director Fran Berman and Calit2 director Larry Smarr on the danger -- and likelihood -- that the federal government will fall behind in support of supercomputing advances in the U.S.
[more]

11.12.2005
"Boston Globe"
Civilians Hired to Aid Boston Fingerprint Lab

A year after shutting its troubled fingerprint lab, the Boston Police Department has hired two highly trained civilian analysts to staff a restructured unit.
[more]

11.12.2005
"Boston Globe"
Boston Police Hire Civilian Fingerprint Analysts

Boston police have hired two civilian fingerprint analysts as part of an effort to restore credibility to their fingerprint unit, which Commissioner Kathleen O'Toole shut down a year ago.
[more]

11.5.2005
"New York Times"
Researchers Look to Create a Synthesis of Art and Science for the 21st Century

Technology reporter John Markoff attended the dedication of Calit2's new building at UCSD and lauds the institute's marriage of arts and science research. Calit2 director Larry Smarr and UCSD Division director Ramesh Rao are quoted.
[more]

11.5.2005
"CNET News"
Researchers look to create synthesis of art and science

The online technology news service picked up this story from the New York Times on the multidisciplinary efforts of Calit2, linking researchers from science, engineering and the arts on the UCSD campus.
[more]

11.3.2005
"HPCwire"
Haplotypes May Provide Key to Genetic Variation

Bioinformatics experts at UCSD and Calit2 have developed a very fast, low-cost computational tool to 'crunch' the world's largest repository of genotypes in order to predict genetic variations. Computer scientist Eleazar Eskin is quoted.
[more]

11.3.2005
"HPCwire"
SDSU Visualizes Blue Marble Imagery

Calit2 director Larry Smarr is mentioned in this article about efforts by the Visualization Center at SDSU using SGI technology to process satellite imagery. SDSU professor Eric Frost is quoted.
[more]

11.2.2005
"Sony News & Information"
Opening Ceremony at UCSD for Cutting-Edge Research Facility Features Sony SXRD 4K Resolution Projector

In a news release, Sony reports on the use of Sony's super high resolution 4K projector in the auditorium of Calit2's new building at UCSD. Calit2's Tom DeFanti is quoted.
[more]

11.1.2005
"CCN Magazine"
Wireless Base Stations

Engineers at Calit2, UCSD and industry collaborators have achieved greater than 50 percent efficiency in wireless power amplifiers for cellular base stations -- a record which could foretell more powerful base stations.
[more]

10.31.2005
"This Week @ UCSD"
High Tech Facility Brings UCSD to Leading Edge of Digital Revolution

On Friday, officials dedicated the new home of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, better known as Calit2. An open house followed, showcasing about 150 projects.
[more]

10.29.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
UCSD dedicates high-tech institute

The University of California San Diego dedicated the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology yesterday and said the 215,000-square-foot facility will be named Atkinson Hall in honor of former UC President and UCSD Chancellor Richard C. Atkinson.
[more]

10.28.2005
"North County Times"
UCSD institute gets $1.5M from Qualcomm

The new California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology at UC San Diego received a $1.5 million donation Friday from Qualcomm.  The donation announcement was made before more than 1,000 people who attended the dedication of the building that will house the institute, which is commonly called "Calit2."
[more]

10.11.2005
"Electronic Engineering Times"
Next-generation cinema steals iGrid spotlight

The publication's Chappell Brown does a roundup of cool technologies demonstrated at the iGrid 2005 conference hosted by Calit2 in San Diego last week, including NTT's demo with other organizations of 4K digital-cinema technology over Internet Protocol optical fiber. The same article appeared in the Oct. 12 issue of Information Week magazine.
[more]

10.6.2005
"SDSUniverse"
SDSU has Super Computer Solutions to Global Disasters

San Diego State researchers gave top international scientists a real-time virtual tour of areas damaged by hurricanes using a computer in Tokyo controlled by a keyboard and mouse in San Diego.
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10.6.2005
"DANTE"
DANTE contributes to iGRID 2005

DANTE's engineers have been working with CANARIE (the Canadian Research and Education Network) and i2CAT to support an application that will demonstrate multistream High Definition Television (HDTV) at iGRID 2005, in San Diego, USA. DANTE’s engineers will establish lightpath connections on GÉANT, to enable a demonstration that will see HDTV data transferred between San Diego, Ottawa and Barcelona.
[more]

10.5.2005
"The New York Times"
The Time Is Now: Bust Up the Box!

Millions of miles of fiber-optic cables are weaving together software that lives on the Internet and data moving at the speed of light into a single global fabric. Technology writer John Markoff talks about the paradigm shift with Calit2 director Larry Smarr at iGrid 2005.
[more]

10.5.2005
"Science Grid This Week"
Science, Art, Advanced Networks Meet at iGrid 2005

Advanced optical networks and light path technology were on display at iGrid 2005, held September 26–30 at the new Calit2 building on the campus of the University of California, San Diego.
[more]

10.4.2005
"Wired"
R is for Robot

In the October issue, Larry Gallagher reports on the efforts of UCSD professor Javier Movellan to develop robots that can interact intuitively with pre-school children. Movellan and his lab will be located in the Calit2 building, where he will cooperate with others working on artificial intelligence.
[more]

9.30.2005
"The Advocate (Louisiana)"
LSU researchers linked to San Diego, Czech Republic during demonstration

Business writer Ned Randolph reports on the demonstration of the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative, linking the LSU faculty by a high-definition teleconference with colleagues in the Czech Republic and San Diego as part of iGrid 2005.
[more]

9.27.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Networking researchers show their stuff at iGrid

Technology reporter Jonathan Sidener reports on the opening of iGrid 2005, including the demonstration of streaming 4K super high definition video from Tokyo to San Diego. Calit2 director Larry Smarr is quoted saying that a "lot of people have experienced videoconferencing on the Internet that is low-resolution, shaky video... It's going out over the shared Internet, which is like driving at 5 p.m. on the freeway. This is going over its own dedicated optic circuit. It's like having the freeway to yourself."

[more]

9.27.2005
"CNET.com"
Test to Take High Definition to Next Level

The online technology news service reprints the New York Times exclusive on the demo of 4K video streaming at iGrid 2005.
[more]

9.26.2005
"New York Times"
Like High-Def? Here Comes the Next Level

Technology correspondent John Markoff reports on the first international real-time streaming of 4K quality digital cinema, to be unveiled on day-one of iGrid 2005 at Calit2 in San Diego.
[more]

9.26.2005
"International Herald Tribune"
Screen test: New video standard aimed at Hollywood The New York Times

Scientists and engineers in the United States and Japan were planning to test the highest-resolution videoconferencing system in the world.
[more]

9.23.2005
"LightReading"
Glimmerglass in iGrid Demos

The optical-networking news service reports on the acquisition of an optical switch made by Glimmerglass, and quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as saying it allows the institute and upcoming iGrid participants to “dynamically re-allocate a light path in seconds. This is a huge time-saver for us and critical for conducting important network tests.”

[more]

9.16.2005
"Chronicle of Higher Education"
Technology Researchers Aid Emergency Response

Reporter Jeff Young writes that UCSD researchers have deployed an experimental communication system to the New Orleans area to help keep emergency officials connected. Calit2's UCSD Division director Ramesh Rao is quoted as saying that the researchers have participated in drills with fire squads in the past, but that "this is the first real emergency we've gotten involved in."
[more]

9.14.2005
"Med Gadget"
Fingering Fingerprints

A recent study by UC Irvine's Simon Cole suggests that fingerprinting isn't infallible when it comes to identification.
[more]

9.13.2005
"Voice of San Diego"
Computer Scientist Sees San Diego's Future

In an interview with Voice senior editor Neil Morgan, Calit2 director Larry Smarr speculates on the roles of the institute, UCSD and the tech sector in the development of San Diego as a 21st century economy.
[more]

9.12.2005
"GRIDtoday"
'Not at the End of the Rainbow Yet'

The weekly grid-computing e-zine's lead story  is an interview with Calit2 research scientist Tom DeFanti, co-chair of the upcoming iGrid 2005 workshop and symposium, which DeFanti calls "the visualization, networking and Grid computing equivalent of a Grateful Dead concert."
[more]

9.12.2005
"SDSUniverse"
SDSU Visualization Center Assists Hurricane Katrina Relief Efforts

The SDSU online publication highlights the efforts of the university's visualization center under its director, professor Eric Frost, and in collaboration with Calit2, in providing valuable mapping tools to rescue agencies in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.
[more]

9.8.2005
"Boston Globe"
SJC to Hear Arguments on Banning Fingerprint Evidence

The controversy over the reliability of fingerprint evidence is fueling a confrontation that will go before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.
[more]

9.8.2005
"Boston Globe"
Cases in which Fingerprint Evidence Misled Juries and Judges

Simon Cole, a professor of criminology at the University of California, Irvine, and critic of fingerprint analysis, recently identified 20 known cases of fingerprint misidentifications in the United States and United Kingdom dating back to 1918, some of which resulted in wrongful convictions.
[more]

9.7.2005
"Wired News"
Getting the Gulf Back on the Grid

Xeni Jardin reports that "volunteers with the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology at the University of California at San Diego are also trying to help in Katrina's wake." She quotes Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao as saying,  "we have units on the ground there in Baton Rouge with satellite dishes, mobile base stations and a lot of handsets to give out to local responders there to create the communication fabric that's needed as a first step."
[more]

9.6.2005
"National Public Radio"
Techies Find Solutions to Gulf Coast's Telecom Woes

For NPR's Day to Day program, Xeni Jardin reports on ad hoc efforts to bring telecom support to New Orleans and other devastated areas in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She quotes Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao on joint efforts with private industry that includes people on the ground in Baton Rouge and elsewhere. [Click on Audio link to listen] Length: 4:55
[more]

8.29.2005
"FreshNews.com"
Intel Helps UCSD Teach Students About Wireless, Mobile Embedded Systems

The San Diego online technology news service reports on Intel's $193,000 donation of high-end developer's kits for the Jacobs School's new Embedded Systems laboratory and Calit2's Systems on Chip Lab.
[more]

8.29.2005
"Electronic Engineering Times"
Supernets for global research to shine at iGrid

Writer Chappell Brown reports on preparations for iGrid 2005, and notes that Calit2 director Larry Smarr "sees the emerging supernetwork as a pivotal event in the history of computing." Smarr is quoted as saying that "this is a once-in-20-year kind of transition and it's a worldwide phenomenon." Calit2 will host iGrid 2005 in late September. This article also appeared in CommsDesign.
[more]

8.25.2005
"Irvine World News"
One Big Computer Display

Scientists at UCI’s Calit2 completed the world’s highest-resolution computer display.
[more]

8.25.2005
"Irvine World News"
Toyota, UCI Fuel Car Technology

Irvine merged into the future Wednesday when city officials accepted a hydrogen fuel cell SUV from Toyota and the National Fuel Cell Research Center at UC Irvine. The city will become one of three in the state experiencing the cutting-edge technology, and the only one with a vehicle that will be driven by elected officials rather than city staff.

[more]

8.25.2005
"Orange County Register"
Irvine Council Enjoys Sound of Silence

The City of Irvine has the keys to a hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicle, courtesy of Toyota and UCI's National Fuel Cell Research Center.
[more]

8.24.2005
"Los Angeles Times"
Irvine Officials Head Down the Hydrogen Highway

The City of Irvine mayor and city council members will be taking turns at the wheel of a $1-million, hydrogen-powered fuel cell hybrid vehicle as part of a pilot program in conjunction with Toyota and the National Fuel Center Research Center at UC Irvine.


[more]

8.24.2005
"Orange County Register"
Irvine Gets Keys to Fuel-Cell Car

Irvine will be the first city in the nation to receive a Toyota fuel-cell hybrid vehicle. The city is subleasing the car from the National Fuel Cell Research Center at UC Irvine in hope of showcasing the future of transportation.
[more]

8.22.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Imaging Genetics

The meeting of medical imaging and genetic science was examined last week at the University of California, Irvine.
[more]

8.18.2005
"EE Times"
Microfabrica Launches MEMS Design Competition

Andrei Shkel, a UCI Calit2 academic participant, will serve as a judge in a MEMS design competition.
[more]

8.17.2005
"Science Grid This Week"
Live Demonstration of 21st Century National-Scale Team Science

The grid-computing website's "Grids in the News" section links to a story on the OptIPuter website about a joint UCSD and Calit2 partnership with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center over a dedicated 10-Gbps lambda between San Diego and Greenbelt, MD.
[more]

8.16.2005
"Innovations Report"
Live demonstration of 21st century national-scale team science

The German technology news service reports on a partnership of UCSD, Calit2 and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that demonstrated a dedicated 10-Gigabit per second optical pathway between the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Goddard in Maryland.
[more]

8.16.2005
"BroadbandReports.com"
10Gbps Monster Connection

The broadband forum notes that "scientists have all the fun...," referring to the Calit2/NASA Goddard collaboration that recently "conducted the first successful system test of a new coast-to-coast, 10-Gigabit per second Ethernet cyber backplane – or 'lambda' – linking the NASA research center to UCSD 3,000 miles away."
[more]

8.15.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Five Questions: Stefan Savage

Personal Technology writer Jonathan Sidener interviews Calit2 participant and UCSD computer science professor Stefan Savage about his patent-pending SyncScan technology to speed handoff times between Wi-Fi networks. Savage notes that the technology could make a big difference for so-called voice-over-WiFi. "It's perfect for hospitals, where cell phones can interfere with sensitive medical equipment. Wi-Fi is much lower power," explains Savage.
[more]

8.15.2005
"RedNova.com"
Live Demonstration of 21st Century National-scale Team Science

The online technology news service picked up this report on Calit2's partnership with Scripps Institution of Oceanography and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, to demo a 10-Gigabit per second ultra broadband dedicated network between the two institutions for scientific collaboration.
[more]

8.15.2005
"GRIDtoday"
NASA, UCSD Test 10 GbE Path over 3,000 Miles

The grid-computing news service reports on a dedicated lightpath between UCSD and NASA Goddard, enabled by the Calit2-led OptIPuter project and CAVEwave lambda between San Diego and Chicago, and the National LambdaRail to Goddard in Maryland.
[more]

8.14.2005
"The Press-Enterprise"
Security at hand

In a front-page article subtitled "Technology aims to replace passwords," writer Jessica Zisko reports on the growing use of biometric technologies such as fingerprint recognition by consumers and homeland security agencies. She quotes Calit2-affiliated UCSD computer science professor Serge Belongie as saying that "people are getting more comfortable with it, but it is still considered somewhat exotic." Belongie is also the designer of a fingerprint security device now used on laptop computers.
[more]

8.10.2005
"Science Grid This Week"
The Global Lambda Integrated Facility

The grid computing service reports on GLIF, the Global Lambda Integrated Facility, a world-scale Lambda-based laboratory for application and middleware development on emerging LambdaGrids, where applications rely on dynamically configured networks based on optical wavelengths. An illustration using data compiled by Maxine Brown, project manager for the Calit2-led OptIPuter project, "shows the networks that will be in use for the iGrid 2005 workshop" at Calit2 in late September.
[more]

8.10.2005
"Extreme Nano"
VC View: Nano Power

As demand for electricity increases, upgrading our electricity transmission infrastructure becomes a priority. Current copper based lines lose about 7 percent of the power in transmission.  Carbon nanotube fiber bundles have the long term potential to be an ultra low loss, strong and light weight replacement for copper technology. The longest conducting nanotubes produced to date were announced this past October by researchers at UC Irvine -- just 0.4 cm long.
[more]

8.9.2005
"vnunet.com"
Doctors Perform Surgery Over the Web

Scientists in Australia have used Internet links to successfully perform microsurgery on cells located thousands of miles away in a southern California laboratory.
[more]

8.8.2005
"Electronic Engineering Times"
The list: R&D projects that must get done

In a report on big challenges facing the computing industry, Chappell Brown highlights the efforts of Calit2 and other organizations in constructing what is dubbed "the real Info Superhighway." Calit2 director Larry Smarr is quoted as noting that while supercomputer performance increased by a factor "of about 100,000 times...  [while] network performance has gone up by a factor of 320,000 times over the period."
[more]

8.8.2005
"Electronic Engineering Times"
Brightest stars of graphics offer up plenty of gee-whiz

Writer Nicholas Mokhoff reports on SIGGRAPH 2005, and notes that "one outstanding group of researchers from the University of California, San Diego, delivered four papers" at the top international conference on computer graphics. In the report he highlights the work of CSE professor Henrik Wann Jensen, who co-authored three of the papers. 
[more]

8.4.2005
"Irvine World News"
Researchers perform surgery at UCI via Internet

Scientists in Australia have successfully performed laser surgery and “optical trapping” in a UC Irvine laboratory via the Internet.

[more]

8.4.2005
"Electronic Design"
Nano's Success Depends on a Rock Solid Foundation

In general, shorter-length CNTs [Carbon Nanotubes] exhibit better electrical properties than longer ones. But Peter Burke at the University of California, Irvine has successfully demonstrated CNTs with excellent electrical properties that measure 10 times longer than what was previously possible.
[more]

8.3.2005
"Inc. Magazine"
When Technology Runs Amok

Writing in the July 2005 issue of the publication, David Freedman reports on the high failure rate of new computer systems implemented by corporations and large institutions, and interviewed UCSD computer scientist and Calit2 participant Joseph Goguen for the article. Goguen notes that "more than half the large custom systems that are started never reach users... Usually they’re just canceled, but sometimes they’re declared a success and then not used.”
[more]

8.3.2005
"ABC Online"
Sperm Snagged from Afar

Sperm wriggling in a petri dish in the U.S. have been manipulated using Internet and laser technology by scientists on the other side of the world in Australia.

[more]

7.29.2005
"I-Newswire"
California Institute researchers unveil computer graphics

The technology report notes that UCSD and UC Irvine researchers from Calit2 will present papers and exhibits at the annual conference on computer graphics next week in Los Angeles, called SIGGRAPH 2005.
[more]

7.29.2005
"India West"
US Inks Engineering Education MoU with India

Richard Springer reports for the Bay Area weekly magazine on the tie-up between UC Berkeley and UC San Diego and other universities and institutes including Calit2, which are planning to deliver engineering courses in India, initial to the satellite-connected four campuses of AMRITHA Unviersity. 
[more]

7.29.2005
"HPCwire"
FirstMile.US, Calit2 Promote Big Broadband

The high-performance computing news service reports that Calit2 joined the FirstMile.US Partner program, demonstrating "Calit2's commitment to Firstmile.US's goal to enable every member of the American public to have access to big broadband." Calit2 director Larry Smarr is quoted. 
[more]

7.28.2005
"FreshNews.com"
FirstMile.US and Calit2 Partner to Catalyze Big Broadband Everywhere

The San Diego technology news service reports that FirstMile.US and Calit2 announced a partnership today under which Calit2 becomes FirstMile.US’s first partner in its effort to enable every member of the American public to have access to 'big broadband'.
[more]

7.28.2005
"Red Nova"
Researchers Unveil Computer Graphics Innovations at SIGGRAPH

At SIGGRAPH 2005 next week, reports the technology news service, four of the 98 accepted research papers involve authors or co-authors from the Jacobs School's Computer Graphics Lab, led by CSE professor and Calit2 participant Henrik Wann Jensen.
[more]

7.27.2005
"New York Times"
Blending the human genome with art

The newspaper published an article by CNET's Stephanie Olsen on an upcoming exhibit called Ecce Homology, an experiment in "bio-art" led by Calit2 participant Ruth West, director of visual analytics and interactive technologies at UCSD's National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research. The same article appeared on CNET.
[more]

7.27.2005
"Telephony World"
FirstMile.US and Calit2 Catalyze Big Broadband

FirstMile.US and the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) announced a partnership under which Calit2 becomes FirstMile.US's first partner. Calit2 director Larry Smarr is quoted.
[more]

7.27.2005
"Science Update"
Preschool Robot

Radio report on the use of a robot named RUBI to teach pre-school children. UCSD professor Javier Movellan, who will move his Machine Perception Laboratory into the new Calit2 building in La Jolla, is quoted in the report syndicated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [Real player required]

[more]

7.23.2005
"Economic Times of India"
US, India tie up to provide e-learning

The top Indian financial newspaper reports on the partnership of UCSD, Calit2, UC Berkeley and four other American universities that will encourage primarily engineering faculty to spend sabbatical semesters at Amrita University, teaching via satellite to the university's four campuses around India, and eventually to other universities in India.
[more]

7.22.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Study challenges theory of random DNA changes

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports on a study published in the journal "Science" that confirms that "DNA changes that mark mammalian evolution have occurred repeatedly at the same chromosomal breakpoints for millions of years, and these fragile places are also where defects can lead to diseases such as cancer." He quotes one of  the study's co-authors, UCSD computer scientist and Calit2 participant Pavel Pevzner.
[more]

7.22.2005
"Newsday"
Cornell to send faculty to India under agreement

An AP story in Newsday reports that "Cornell University and five other top American colleges will send science, engineering and computing faculty to India to teach students at Amrita University under a new three-year agreement." The article notes that UC San Diego is one of the signatories to the agreement. 

[more]

7.22.2005
"IQ Wireless"
US Researchers Push Open Source For Wireless Development

The London-based technology news service reports that "the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at UCSD has been distributing a hardware-and-software platform for alpha testing wireless research and development... called CalRadio 1.0."
[more]

7.20.2005
"Electronic News"
U.S., Indian Universities Team to Improve Engineering Education

The magazine's online staff report that fvie U.S. universities joined with Indian institutions led by Amrita University "to implement science and engineering education in India over a satellite e-learning network. Industry partners Qualcomm, Microsoft and Cadence Design Systems are providing funding for the project." Jacobs School dean Frieder Seible and Calit2 division director Ramesh Rao are quoted.
[more]

7.18.2005
"FreshNews.com"
California Researchers Offer Open-Source Platform to Speed Wireless Development

The San Diego technology news service reports that Calit2 launched CalRadio, the first in a series of planned devices to speed up and improve the quality of still photos. The project is led by Calit2 principal investigaors including Doug Palmer and Don Kimball.
[more]

7.7.2005
"Irvine World News"
Gaming Goes Deep into Real World

A computer character peers beyond its virtual world to see a “raft” hovering a few inches from the computer screen. The character glances about, then jumps off the monitor and rides the raft across an office or classroom before leaping off to visit another character on a different computer. 
This is the “Virtual Raft Project” created in the laboratory of computer scientist and animator Bill Tomlinson.
[more]

7.3.2005
"New York Times"
The Artists in the Hazmat Suits

In a feature article about "bioart," writer Randy Kennedy notes that UCSD bioartist Ruth West questions whether artists "should be required to abide by all the same extensive rules as a biotech lab. Or, West is quoted as writing in a book of essays she's compiling, "should they be allowed a 'poetic license' which extends to the release of transgenic bacteria into people's homes and the environment?" West is affiliated with Calit2. 
[more]

7.1.2005
"Sierra"
Earth's Innovators

Natalie Jeremijenko, assistant professor in Visual Arts at UCSD and a Calit2 participant, is featured as the first "earth innovator" in coverage describing her feral robotic dogs that "sniff" out environmental toxins.
[more]

7.1.2005
"LightReading"
Cisco Sniffs Out NetSift

Reporter Craig Matsumoto writes about the process of Cisco Systems' purchase of NetSift, a company "founded a year ago by researchers at the University of California, San Diego: professor George Varghese and Ph.D. student Sumeet Singh. Both took time off from academic pursuits to run NetSift, which was developing technology stemming from their UCSD research." Varghese is affiliated with Calit2.
[more]

6.30.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Cisco acquires San Diego startup

Writer Bruce Bigelow reports on the agreement for Cisco Systems to purchase NetSift, a company founded by Calit2 academic participant, UCSD computer science professor George Varghese, and grad student Sumeet Singh.
[more]

6.29.2005
"Science Grid This Week"
Grid Technology Helps NEES Minimize Earthquake Damage

The grid-networking website reports on the cyberinfrastructure and web portal put in place for the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). "At NEESit, we've established NEEScentral, a central portal for researchers, which includes access to a central data repository to store and retrieve all the video, audio and numeric data generated by earthquake engineering experiments," said Lelli Van Den Einde, Assistant Director for NEESit Operations at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. NEESit will be based in the new Calit2 building on the UCSD campus.

[more]

6.28.2005
"Red Nova News"
HIPerWall at Calit2's Center of GRAVITY Will Allow Unprecedented Visualization of Data

The National Science Foundation has funded a project at UC Irvine's Center of GRAVITY (Graphics, Visualization and Imaging Technology) that will provide unprecedented high-capacity visualization capability to researchers. The Highly Interactive Parallelized Display Wall (HIPerWall) is a massively tiled, grid-based display that allows researchers to view and manipulate their data sets at extremely high resolutions, more than 10 times that of most other tiled displays, at a fraction of the cost and physical space required for projection-based systems.
[more]

6.27.2005
"eWeek"
Grids: Conquest of Space

In a cover story featuring Calit2 and SDSC researcher Phil Papadopoulos -- co-PI on the OptIPuter project -- writer Darryl Taft reports on the growing strength in grid computing and networking within SDSC. The article also quotes SDSC director Francine Berman.
[more]

6.27.2005
"Long Beach Press Telegram"
Career Paths

UC Irvine business Professor Kevin Zhu has received the National Science Foundation's Faculty Early Career Development award.
[more]

6.24.2005
"Insight Electronics"
Nanotubes faster than copper

UC Irvine scientists demonstrate for the first time that carbon nanotubes can route electrical signals on a chip faster than traditional copper or aluminium wires, at speeds of up to 10 GHz.
[more]

6.17.2005
"Orange County Register"
UCI Business Professor Honored

UCI Professor Kevin Zhu was awarded a $377,000 NSF CAREER grant to continue his research on the impact of information technology on business
[more]

6.16.2005
"Discovery Channel"
Wireless System Turns Radio Listeners into DJs

Even as electronic media becomes more and more interactive, radio remains as passive a form of entertainment as it was a century ago. In a report on new technology called 'roadcasting,' reports writer Tracy Staedter. Mohan Trivedi, director of both the Computer Vision and Robotics Research Laboratory at UCSD and leader of Calit2's automotive telematics research there, is quoted as warning "that with more cars transmitting information wirelessly, they risk being hacked in ways that researchers have not even considered."

[more]

6.14.2005
"Washington Times"
Birds Fly Off the Screen to Teach Ecology

Calit2-affiliated researcher Bill Tomlinson is developing an educational video game whose characters literally jump off one screen and onto a computer "raft" to teach children about ecosystem recovery.
[more]

6.13.2005
"MSNBC"
Robo Roach: Bionic Bug Takes Control of the Driver's Seat

Calit2 and ACE graduate student Garnet Hertz uses hissing cockroaches to navigate robotic vehicles.
[more]

6.13.2005
"Kansas City Star"
Robot Driven by a Roach

ACE and Calit2 graduate student Garnet Hertz uses hissing cockroaches to navigate robotic vehicles.
[more]

6.12.2005
"Weekend Edition, NPR"
Studying Robotics with a Roach Coach

ACE and Calit2 graduate student Garnet Hertz uses hissing cockroaches to navigate robotic vehicles.
[more]

6.10.2005
"Telecommunications Reports"
Workshop Participants Back FCC's Spectrum Approach

In its June 2005 issue, the publication notes that 40 industry, government, and academic experts gathered at UCSD recently to develop scenarios on the future of wireless markets and regulations in the U.S., China, and other developing countries. The article is based in part on an interview with Peter Cowhey, dean of UCSD's Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies and policy layer leader for Calit2.
[more]

6.10.2005
"Orange County Register"
UCI Breakthrough May Mean Faster Computer Chips

Minuscule technology successfully tested at UCI could hasten the day when computer speeds reach about three times faster than today.
[more]

6.10.2005
"Forbes"
Faster Cell Phones, Computers on the Horizon

California scientists used nanotechnology to create the world's fastest method for transmitting data in cell phones and computers. A team from the University of California, Irvine used carbon nanotubes instead of copper or aluminum wires to achieve processing speeds of gigahertz -- one billion times the hertz, the basic unit of measuring such signals, the school said Friday.
[more]

6.10.2005
"Sacramento Business Journal"
Nanotubes Faster than Copper in Chips

Carbon nanotubes can route electrical signals on a computer chip faster than traditional copper or aluminum wires, at speeds of up to 10 GHz, according to experiments reported Thursday by scientists at the University of California, Irvine.
[more]

6.10.2005
"SoCalTech.com"
Researchers Say Nanotubes Boost Semiconductor Speeds

Scientists at UC Irvine said this week that they have created the world's fastest method for transmitting information in cell phones and computers.
[more]

6.8.2005
"Unstrung"
UCSD Touts 3D Video App

The wireless technology news service reportst that UCSD computer scientists (and Calit2 participants) Bill Griswold and Neil McCurdy introduced a new technique for mixing images and video feeds from mobile cameras in the field to provide remote viewers with a virtual window into a physical environment. The application constructs a 3D virtual environment dynamically out of the live video streams.
[more]

6.7.2005
"New York Times"
A Better Robot, With Help From Roaches

UC Irvine ACE graduate student and Calit2 research fellow Garnet Hertz is using a robotic device to transport cockroaches.
[more]

6.7.2005
"United Press International"
Cockroach-Driven Robot Tests Intelligence

Garnet Hertz, a Calit2 graduate research fellow, is building a cockroach-driven robotic vehicle to test ideas about learning and intelligence.
[more]

6.2.2005
"New University"
UC Patents Generate Millions Annually

Research in the University of California system is able to generate significant amounts of revenue as a result of the UC’s ownership of patents, especially if the research can be transformed into economically viable products and technologies.

[more]

6.2.2005
"Irvine World News"
UCI Students Win Annual Competition

A team of UCI students, in conjunction with Calit2 affiliated faculty Goran Matijasevic and G.P. Li, won an annual business competition with their plan for a company focused on power amplifiers for wireless communications.
[more]

5.27.2005
"ZDnet Between the Lines"
Larry Smarr: Pumping the Net up for gigabyte images

Columnist Dan Farber reports that "Larry Smarr believes that the emerging Internet information grid is going to be far more pervasive than the electric power grid is today. He is the Harry E. Gruber Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, UCSD, and director, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, and in 1985 founded the National Center for Supercomputer Applications at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana." This blog offers a downloadable MP3 of Farber's audio interview with Smarr after the "Future in Review" conference.

[more]

5.26.2005
"Science Grid This Week"
Computer Scientists, Geoscientists Meet in San Diego

In a report picked up by Science Grid This Week, Katie Yurkewicz writes about  the Geosciences Network (GEON) Third Annual Meeting, held May 5-6 in San Diego and hosted by the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UCSD. She quotes GEON project director and SDSC/Calit2 Synthesis Center director Chaitan Baru as saying that "GEON's basic focus is on data integration. Sub-disciplines of geoscience work with very different types of data, but they all study the same structures. GEON works to provide access to tools and data that will allow earth scientists to efficiently answer questions that cut across several disciplines."
[more]

5.26.2005
"CTWatch Quarterly"
The Cyberinfrastructure Backplane: The Jump to Light Speed

In the May 2005 edition of Cyberinfrastructure Technology Watch Quarterly, Calit2 director Larry Smarr and SDSC senior researcher Phil Papadopoulos guest edited this issue and focused on "the state of one and 10 Gbps long-haul, optical circuits supporting the research community." Authors in this issue include Tom deFanti and Maxine Brown, co-PI and project manager respectively on the Smarr-led OptIPuter project. The print version can be downloaded in PDF format at this site.

[more]

5.25.2005
"ZDnet"
The future of the enterprise and grids

In his Between the Lines blog, technology columnist Dan Farber reports from the "Future in Review" conference, and quotes from Calit2 director Larry Smarr about the problem with grids and the shared Internet infrastructure. "We all live in little data caves with teeny keyholes looking out into the Net," Smarr said. "How can we go and get things when it’s built on an unpredictable, shared Internet?" The article mentions the Smarr-led OptIPuter project.
[more]

5.24.2005
"Broadband Wireless Exchange Magazine"
UCSD Researchers Test Wireless Technologies in Simulated Medical Disaster Response Drill

Writer Robert Hoskins reports on the involvement of Calit2 and UCSD researchers in a recent emergency-response drill in San Diego. "The first-responder community has welcomed the UCSD team and worked closely with the university researchers and their corporate partners," he reports, and quotes Calit2 division director Ramesh Rao as saying that engineers and first responders "are even starting to speak a similar language."
[more]

5.23.2005
"GRIDtoday"
Larry Smarr on Future of Grid, Cyberinfrastructure

Editor Derrick Harris interviewed Calit2 director Larry Smarr for this Q&A about, "among other things, the effects LambdaGrids will have on Grid computing, the timeline for a legitimate cyberinfrastructure in the United States and what he calls the "Third Era" for campus infrastructure."
[more]

5.16.2005
"Telephony World"
UCSD Researchers Test Wireless Technologies in Simulated Medical Disaster Response Drill

The online news service reports on the participation by researchers from Calit2 the Jacobs School of Engineering and Calit2 as part of the WIISARD project, in a disaster drill that allowed them to showcase several new wireless-based technologies. UCSD division dierctor Ramesh Rao and layer leader Bill Griswold were among those quoted.

[more]

5.13.2005
"Discovery Channel"
Tsunamis Lay Await in Lake Tahoe

Larry O'Hanlon reports on research by Calit2-affiliated ocean researcher Graham Kent of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Kent's study of Lake Tahoe showed that "faults hidden beneath the waves of one of the world's deepest lakes may occasionally trigger large quakes that could set 30-foot tsunamis sloshing mercilessly back and forth." Kent manages the Calit2-funded Visualization Center at Scripps.
[more]

5.13.2005
"O.C. Register"
The sounds of light and movement

OP_ERA, at UCI's Beall Center at first glance looks like a large, dark gallery room containing a three-walled box lined with strands of light. The exhibit is really a giant, walk-in music box.

[more]

5.11.2005
"IEEE Design and Test"
The Future Depends on Innovation

Journal editor and Calit2 participant Rajesh Gupta commissioned this oral history of  QUALCOMM founder Irwin Jacobs that appears in the May-June 2005 issue of the IEEE journal. A companion video of Jacobs' interview with Kenneth Wagner was produced by Calit2 and the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering in conjunction with the IEEE History Center and IEEE Computer Society. To watch the Real media clip, click here. Length: 1:22:07 [Real player required]
[more]

5.11.2005
"Sun News Today"
A Close Look at Grey Matter

As part of Sun Microsystems' video series, Chris LeGrand reports from San Diego on Sun's role in brain research -- through Java workstations powering the UCSD Biowall. Calit2 participant and School of Medicine professor Mark Ellisman is interviewed. [Real player required]
[more]

5.6.2005
"United Press International"
Wireless World: Bomb detection wirelessly

Technology writer Gene Koprowski reports that "a project underway at the University of California, San Diego, enables paramedics to tap into networks from a Personal Digital Assistant or PDA and essentially navigate the disaster scene by zooming and panning with the networked cameras, without moving the cameras." He quotes Calit2 layer leader Mohan Trivedi as saying that the technology -- called the Digital Tele-Viewer -- was funded by the National Science Foundation for "dealing with IT for first-responders, and we will be initiating another effort with the (Department of Defense) and DHS." [This link is to the UPI story as carried by the Washington Times.]
[more]

5.5.2005
"International Herald Tribune"
Ultrawideband takes on untangling the house

Picking up a New York Times article by John Markoff, the Paris-based newspaper notes that ECE professor and Calit2 participant Larry Milstein remains concerned about interference problems with so-called ultra-wide-band wireless technology.

[more]

5.5.2005
"Discovery Channel"
Virtual Music Box Makes Sound Visual

A room-sized music box uses human-computer interface technology to create a virtual environment where visitors see sound at UC Irvine's Beall Center for Art & Technology.
[more]

5.4.2005
"New York Times"
Bandwidth Advance Hints at Future Beyond Wi-Fi

Technology reporter John Markoff reports that "one barrier that has held back the much-hyped convergence of the computer and consumer electronics industries has been the tangle of wires that is needed to connect the cascade of home video, audio, Internet and game gadgets. Now the drive to unwire the living room is about to get a push." He quotes Calit2 UCSD participant Larry Milstein as being still concerned with interference from so-called ultra wideband  (UWB) technology. 

[more]

5.4.2005
"Digital Divide Network"
Technology for Social Inclusion: An Interview with Mark Warschauer

Warschauer, a Calit2 academic participant, researches the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in schools; the impact of ICT on language and literacy practices; and the relationship of ICT to institutional reform, democracy, and social development.
[more]

5.2.2005
"Asbury Park Press"
Web Extra: Workers Bombarded with Stimuli

The average employee's attention span is, at most, 12 minutes. The average worker switches to a different task every three minutes and gets interrupted every two minutes, says Gloria Mark, a professor at UC Irvine and a Calit2 academic participant, who studies the effects of multitasking on workers. She reported her findings to Ergonomics Today.

[more]

5.2.2005
"UCSD Connect Newsletter"
Researcher's Hub: Frieder Seible

Editor Andrea Siedsma interviewed Jacobs School of Engineering dean Frieder Seible for this profile of the structural engineer who also founded the Charles Lee Powell Structural Research Laboratories at UCSD. Seible is quoted as saying, “our facilities are so unique because nobody else can do the kind of work we are doing. We are known in places like Europe and Asia but very few people know about us in San Diego.” Seible is co-chair of Calit2's Governing Board.
[more]

5.1.2005
"North County Times"
UCSD researchers working to make highways safer

Writer Ruth Marvin Webster reports that "in today's fast-paced world, it's not easy for drivers to keep their attention on the road, but technology being developed at UC San Diego's Jacob School of Engineering may change that." She interviewed electrical engineering professor Mohan Trivedi -- who leads Calit2's intelligent transportation and telematics group at UCSD -- for the Sunday feature about his efforts to create a new "driver ecology."
[more]

4.29.2005
"Voice of San Diego"
Distinguished ladies and fellows

In its Daily Buzz column, the online news service reports that "five faculty members at the University of California, San Diego have been named fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences," including Jack Wolf, a professor of magnetics and Calit2 participant.
[more]

4.29.2005
"San Diego Daily Transcript"
Five at UCSD named fellows of American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Writer Erik Pisor reports on the election of Calit2 participant and Jacobs School professor Jack Wolf as one of five UCSD faculty named as fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.
[more]

4.28.2005
"Wi-Fi Planet"
Faster Wi-Fi Handoff Arrives?

Writer Ed Sutherland interviewed Calit2 participant and UCSD computer science professor Stefan Savage for this article on a new method called SyncScan for accelerating how long it takes for a Wi-Fi device to hand off a signal to a neighboring Wi-Fi access point.
[more]

4.28.2005
"Bioscience Technology"
Computational Optimization of Genes

A spin-off company of the University of California, Irvine, will offer a new technology developed for Computer Optimized DNA Assembly (CODA) and protein expression optimization. The technology was developed at UCI's Institute for Genomics and Bioinformatics (IGB), a Calit2 academic partner.
[more]

4.27.2005
"Peoria (ILL) Journal Star"
Finalists for Peoria Prize for Creativity

Three finalists -- "The Virtual Raft Project" among them -- are vying for the $10,000 Peoria Prize for Creativity to be announced April 29 at the Discovery Forum 2005 at the Peoria (Ill.) Civic Center. Nominees must demonstrate a collaboration between art and science in their project. The Virtual Raft,  an interactive art piece that uses computers, is the brainchild of UCI assisstant professor and Calit2 academic participant Bill Tomlinson.
[more]

4.25.2005
"Barrons"
Plugged In

In his weekly column, writer Eric Savitz notes "a recent patent filing by two scientists at the University of California-San Diego for a method to dramatically improve the handoff time from one Wi-Fi access point to another. Stefan Savage , a UCSD engineering professor, and graduate student Ishwar Ramani claim they have solved the problem by having Wi-Fi software prepare for an eventual switch to a new access point by constantly seeking and tracking all of the accessible alternative access points. The result is far faster switching from one access point to the other: fast enough to make wireless VoIP a viable technology." Savage is an academic participant in Calit2.

[more]

4.21.2005
"OC Register"
UCI Honored

UC Irvine hydrologist and Calit2 division council member Soroosh Sorooshian will receive NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal for pioneering work in using satellite data to better understand how much rain falls around the globe and for helping the government to make more accurate predictions about floods and droughts. The medal – the highest award NASA gives non-government employees – will be bestowed Wednesday in Washington, D.C.
[more]

4.19.2005
"Orange County Register"
UCI Research Briefs

Chemist Ken Shea and bioengineer Abe Lee have received $80,000 from the Henry Nicholas Foundation to search for ways to synthesize plastic antibodies that can be used for such things as diagnosing disease and sensing pollution in ecosystems.
[more]

4.19.2005
"Daily Pilot"
UCI professors share in research cash prizes

Four UC Irvine faculty projects will share the first Nicholas Foundation Prize for Cross-Disciplinary Research, a spokesman for the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology announced late last week.
[more]

4.18.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Street smarts

Personal technology reporter Jonathan Sidener interviews Jacobs School electrical and computer engineering professor Mohan Trivedi and profiles a series of reseach projects in his Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) -- research at UCSD that "monitors road conditions and behavior to increase driver awareness and safety."Trivedi leads Calit2's Intelligent Transportation and Telematics group at UCSD.

[more]

4.18.2005
"Chemical & Engineering News"
Laser Sensor Detects TNT Vapor

Reporter Celia Henry reports on a device developed at MIT that is based on a lasing semiconducting polyber and has unprecedented sensitivity. The article quotes Calit2 researcher and UCSD chemistry professor Michael Sailor, an expert in chemical sensing, as saying that "the impact of this work should be quite broad in scope."

[more]

4.18.2005
"UCSD Connect Newsletter"
UCSD Researchers Enhance High-Speed Internet Access Via 802.11

The San Diego technology e-newsletter reports on SyncScan, a new method devised by Jacobs School computer science and engineering professor Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani to speed up the handoff of Wi-Fi coverage from one access point to the next.

[more]

4.15.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
People to watch: Stefan Savage

In a Q&A with technology reporter Bruce Bigelow, CSE professor and Calit2 participant Stefan Savage says "the job of a professor is a combination of storytelling, cat herding and panhandling. I need to raise money, make sure that everyone is making progress and ultimately convince people to see the world a particular way. It's this last element – which is at the core of teaching and research – that is both the hardest and the most rewarding."

[more]

4.15.2005
"RF Globalnet"
Faster Handoff Between Wi-Fi Networks Promises Near-Seamless 802.11 Roaming

The wireless technology news service reports that "Jacobs School of Engineering professor Stefan Savage and graduate student Ishwar Ramani have a patent pending on the basic invention behind SyncScan, a process to achieve practical, fast handoff for 802.11 infrastructure networks." Savage is an active academic participant in Calit2. This article also appeared in PhysOrg.comInnovations Report (Germany), and FreshNews.comWireless Developer Network, ScienceBlog, and Telephony World.
[more]

4.15.2005
"Voice of San Diego"
21st annual UCSD Connect Life Sciences and High Tech Financial Forum on Thursday

Guest columnist Neil Senturia reports on the 21st annual UCSD Connect Life Sciences and High Tech Financial Forum, and highlights the presentation of Calit2 director Larry Smarr. "He encouraged the University of California, San Diego to support entrepreneurship and particularly 'the mandate to innovate.' [Smarr] compared the United States to some of the Scandinavian countries and also to China, Japan and Korea, and the truth is that the United States is not the leader in innovation at this point. In part, he argued this is because of extreme government regulations, particularly in telecommunications. He also said that dorm rooms are ahead of our family rooms since broadband is ubiquitous on the college campus," writes Senturia.
[more]

4.14.2005
"VNUnet"
US researchers turbocharge Wi-Fi roaming

Writer Robert Jaques reports that SyncScan technology developed by UCSD computer scientist Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani promises a "dramatic increase in 802.11 access speeds." Savage is an active academic participant in Calit2. This article also appeared in Forbes.com, IT Week (Netherlands),  Computing (UK) and What PC? (UK).
[more]

4.14.2005
"TechWorld (UK)"
New invention means smoother, faster Wi-Fi roaming

Writer Peter Judge reports on a UCSD invention called SyncScan that would speed up the handoff from one Wi-Fi access point to the next. He notes that the "software upgrade [could be] a huge boon to VoIP handsets," because users could use their VoIP phones on the move without being confined to a single access point's footprint. CSE professor Stefan Savage -- an active participant in Calit2 --  is quoted. 
[more]

4.8.2005
"Indianapolis Star"
Attention, please. Distracted workers often fail to produce

The average employee's attention span is, at most, 12 minutes. The average worker switches to a different task every three minutes and gets interrupted every two minutes, according to Gloria Mark, a UCI professor and Calit2 academic affiliate, who studies the effects of multitasking on workers.
[more]

4.5.2005
"Technology Review"
Wireless Lookout: Fast Hand-off for Wi-Fi Networks

In the Information Technology section of the MIT-based publication's April edition, Monye Baker reports that "Ishwar Ramani and Stefan Savage of the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new approach, called SyncScan, that allows faster handoffs" when moving from one Wi-Fi network to another. "SyncScan shrinks the handoff delay without the need for hardware upgrades or changes to IEEE 802.11, the most widely deployed standard for wireless networks," notes the magazine. "Though SyncScan is still not perfectly synchronized, it promises to greatly improve the quality, convenience, and value of communication in Wi-Fi networks."

[more]

4.5.2005
"Barron's"
Plugged In: Eureka

In his weekly column, writer Eric Savitz notes "a recent patent filing by two scientists at the University of California-San Diego for a method to dramatically improve the handoff time from one Wi-Fi access point to another. Stefan Savage , a UCSD engineering professor, and graduate student Ishwar Ramani claim they have solved the problem by having Wi-Fi software prepare for an eventual switch to a new access point by constantly seeking and tracking all of the accessible alternative access points. The result is far faster switching from one access point to the other: fast enough to make wireless VoIP a viable technology." Savage is an academic participant in Calit2.
[more]

4.4.2005
"III-Vs Review"
DOD, UCSD, MOCVD, III-Vs, MQW and

The online edition of the advanced semiconductor magazine reports that Calit2 participant and UCSD electrical and computer engineering chair Paul Yu "is talking with several vendors before making a final selection now that the funding is approved. He is also looking into possibly purchasing a one- or two-year-old reactor to maximise on the budget." That purchase is of an MOCVD system for depositing thin-film layers of materials, metals and oxides on tomorrow’s semiconductors, and the reactor will be located in Calit2's new building on the UCSD campus.  
[more]

4.1.2005
"HPCwire"
DoD, Cal(IT)2 Fund $500,000 Investment in Chip Tech at UCSD

The high-performance computing e-newsletter and website report that Calit2 at UCSD and the Pentagon's DURIP program will "jointly fund acquisition of a state-of-the-art system for depositing thin-film layers of materials, metals and oxides on tomorrow's semiconductors." Principal investigator Paul Yu, chair of the Jacobs School's Electrical and Computer Engineering department, is quoted.

[more]

4.1.2005
"KFMB-TV Channel 8 (CBS)"
Car Viruses

UCSD professor Mohan Trivedi explains the potential dangers of viruses affecting automobiles given the increasing number of computer processors used in cars. The report includes footage of Trivedi's Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA). Length: 2:39  [Realplayer required]
[more]

3.30.2005
"Riverside Press Enterprise"
Big Game Hunting

A newspaper columnist visits a middle-school "college week" event and ends up learning a few things about where video game design curricula are offered.
[more]

3.29.2005
"San Diego Business Journal"
UCSD To Acquire Microchip Technology

Technology writer Brad Graves reports that the "Army Research Office and a University of California research institute are jointly buying a complex piece of hardware used in the manufacture of microchips...The $500,000 collection of hardware will occupy a specialized lab at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology building, which the university is in the process of finishing."
[more]

3.29.2005
"PhysOrg.com"
DoD, Calit2 Fund $500,000 Investment in Advanced Chip Technology

The online news service reports that the "U.S. Department of Defense and the UCSD division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) will jointly fund acquisition of a state-of-the-art system for depositing thin-film layers of materials, metals and oxides on tomorrow’s semiconductors. The system will initially supply optical devices to a DoD-funded, small-business research project on ‘optical tagging’ – using optics to identify and track friends or enemies on the battlefield."
[more]

3.25.2005
"Daily Pilot"
UCI gets fueled up for World's Fair

UC Irvine's National Fuel Cell Research Center, a Calit2 academic partner, gets to show off its research in fuel-cell technology through September at the 2005 World's Fair in Japan.
[more]

3.25.2005
"Small Times (Ann Arbor, Mich.)"
Lookback: Career-Hopping Engineer Leaves Lasting Imprint

Bill Tang, UCI professor of biomedical engineering, electrical engineering and computer science, and the Integrated Nanosystems Research Facility, is also a Calit2 academic affiliate. He came to UCI after a stint at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and a long and varied engineering career.
[more]

3.24.2005
"Santa Cruz Sentinel"
UCSC adds new track for computer science majors: Game design

Computer gaming is a $7 billion/year industry and a focus of Calit2 research. Courses in computer gaming, which have been part of the curriculum for five years at UCI, are now being added at other universites. UC Santa Cruz is adding a track in game design as an available option for computer science students.
[more]

3.23.2005
"Santa Monica Mirror"
Officials Talk Traffic With Visiting Experts

Will Recker, UCI professor of civil and environmental engineering, director of the Institute of Transportation Studies, and Calit2 academic affiliate, recently made a presentation to the Santa Monica (CA) Cty Council and Planning Commission. The city is investigating improvements in traffic methodology.
[more]

3.21.2005
"Newsweek/MSNBC"
Life Isn't Just as You Want It? Remix It!

In a report on last week's ETech Emerging Technology Conference in San Diego, Newsweek senior editor Steven Levy writes that the "weirdness bar was set pretty high... Even so, a lot of the techie presenters cleared it with room to spare. These certainly included the University of California, San Diego, professor who spoke of unleashing 'feral robotic dogs' on contaminated landfill sites." He was referencing the work of Calit2 academic participant Natalie Jeremijenko, a UCSD professor of Visual Arts.

[more]

3.17.2005
"Irvine World News"
UCI People

Ramesh Jain, professor of embedded and experiential systems at Georgia Institute of Technology, has been named the first Donald Bren Professor of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine. he is also a Calit2 academic affiliate.

[more]

3.16.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Sniffing out pollution

Writer Mike Lee reports on a research project at UCSD in which toy robotic dogs are equipment with "smell" technology to sniff out and converge on a pollution hot spot. The sniffing technology was developed by Calit2 researcher and UCSD visual arts professor Natalie Jeremijenko "to draw attention to the consequences of a throw-away society and the environmental problems of modern life."[For more on this subject, read the Calit2 feature article "What Toys Can Teach Us".]
[more]

3.14.2005
"Information Week"
Seismic Shift

Writer Aaron Ricadela reports on the current state of the U.S. supercomputing program, and notes that funding for cyberinfrastructure appears hamstrung. Calit2 director Larry Smarr is quoted as saying that NSF's cyberinfrastructure program "was originally talked about as having a $1 billion budget," while NSF's allotment for cyberinfrastructure today is about half that amount. The article also quotes San Diego Supercomputer Center director Fran Berman as saying that through the supercomputing centers, the NSF's cyberinfrastructure program "will fund computing research that could help users deal with data coming from sources as varied as tiny wireless sensors and mammoth supercomputers."
[more]

3.12.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Spotlight on Nanotechnology: The rapidly advancing science is forecast to transform society

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports on the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, which began March 13 in San Diego, and highlighted the work of two Calit2-affiliated researchers: Materials and Devices layer leader Ivan Schuller, who's working on an "experimental sensor, supported by the Defense Department, [which] would combine a series of magnetic, infrared, chemical and biological detectors. These nano-instruments would send their findings to another part of the sensor that then transmits the information by wireless communication to a central command center"; and biochemist Michael Sailor, who has developed "smart dust" and is quoted as saying that "nanotechnology is something that nature's been doing for millennia." 

[more]

3.11.2005
"Chronicle of Higher Education"
Missing the Boat, or Penny-Wise Caution?

An emerging Internet technology, called Internet Protocol version 6, allows 80,000 trillion trillion times more Internet addresses than the current system, but.has been ignored by most American colleges so far. UC San Diego and Calit2 have implemented the technology in certain portions of their networks. 
[more]

3.3.2005
"New York Times"
GeoWall Project Expands the Window Into Earth Science

Writer Henry Fountain reports on the GeoWall project that is bringing 3D display technology to classrooms, and profiles the work of University of Illinois researcher Jason Leigh, co-PI on the OptIPuter project led by Calit2 director Larry Smarr. Leigh was a developer of the GeoWall, "an inexpensive system that uses a PC with an advanced graphics card and digital projectors to present the geophysical world to dozens or even hundreds of students at a time."
[more]

3.2.2005
"FreshNews.com"
Professor-Turned-CEO Pitches New Wireless Data Transfer Technology

The southern California technology news service reports on the decision by UCSD electrical and computer engineering professor Sujit Dey to set up a company called Ortiva Wireless, to develop data-shaping technologies for high-speed Internet browsing.

[more]

3.1.2005
"Light Reading"
OFC Talks to Include Mars Laser

In a preview of the upcoming Optical Fiber Communication Conference and Exposition/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference in Anaheim, CA, starting March 6, the technology news service reports that Calit2 director Larry Smarr will deliver a speech about the OptIPuter -- "an experimental system architecture that tightly couples computing, storage, visualization and networking to exploit the rapidly expanding capabilities of fiber optic networks."
[more]

2.24.2005
"Irvine World News"
'Bots Jam at UCI

At the Beall Center for Art and Technology at UC Irvine, advanced robots are exhibited in a series of space-age kinetic sound sculptures. They are complemented by a string-like, colorful light display on the gallery floor that echoes the rhythmic pulse of sound robots in action.

The group, known as LEMUR (League of Electronic Musical Urban Roots), is a Brooklyn-based artist collective that specializes in electronic music. Recognizing that music and computer programming are both languages made from codes, LEMUR easily spans many disciplines.

LEMUR combines sculpture, electronic engineering, the latest, most up-to-date workings of telecommunications with music and computers. Also, artificial intelligence is a significant component, the ability of a computer program to "learn" from newly encountered data. Nevertheless, LEMUR’s purpose is music first, technology second.
[more]

2.23.2005
"Science Daily"
Mapping Human Genetic Variation Across Populations

Reporting on a study first published in Science magazine, based on sequencing of 71 individuals' genomes by Perlegen Sciences, Inc., the online news service notes that "scientists at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California, San Diego, and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) helped analyze the set of over 100 million genotypes from the over 1.5 million SNPs sequenced in each sample by Perlegen."

[more]

2.22.2005
"Daily Pilot"
UCI professor earns national award

UC Irvine's Susan Bryant, dean of the university's School of Biological Sciences and a member of the Calit2 governing board, was elected as a 2005 Assn. for Women in Science fellow. She received the award Feb. 20 at a ceremony in Washington, D.C..
[more]

2.21.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Bioterror experts propose early-warning technologies

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports on an AAAS briefing about efforts to develop bioterrorism technologies to detect and then respond to possible attacks. He notes that UCSD and SDSU are working on such technologies, including "smart dust" (partially funded by Calit2) and command centers to "to test technologies emergency workers will undoubtedly need as they respond to a terror attack. Equipped with computer banks, wall-size video screens and video Internet connections, these 'visualization centers' are designed to provide real-time information on numerous aspects of a disaster," a reference to vizcenters in both the Jacobs School and Calit2's facility at Scripps.
[more]

2.20.2005
"Los Angeles Times"
Art, Science Mix at UCI

At the Beall Center for Art and Technology at UC Irvine, engineers, computer scientists and digital artists create art that is ultramodern, innovative — and sometimes noisy. With its array of interactive, performance- and installation-based exhibits, the Beall Center is well on its way to accomplishing its mission of redefining the gallery experience.
[more]

2.19.2005
"Innovations Report"
Map of human genetic variation across populations may promise improved disease treatments

The German technology news service reports on the "mapping of key genetic signposts across three human populations [that] could help speed efforts to pinpoint disease-related DNA variations, and ultimately may promise more effective, individualized treatments." It notes that UCSD computer scientist Eleazar Eskin -- a Calit2 researcher -- co-authored the report published in Science magazine.
[more]

2.18.2005
"Science Magazine"
Whole-Genome Patterns of Common DNA Variation in Three Human Populations

Calit2 researcher Eleazar Eskin co-authored a new study mapping genetic variation in three human populations. The UCSD computer scientist cooperated on the study with scientists from Perlegen Sciences, Inc., and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute.
[more]

2.18.2005
"Reuters/Los Angeles Times"
Genome map offers first look at human differences

Writer Maggie Fox reports that the first published map of human genetic differences offers a major step toward truly personalized medicine. She notes that to make the map, scientists at the company Perlegen Sciences "worked with researchers at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California San Diego, and the University of California at Berkeley's International Computer Science Institute." They scanned 71 Americans of African, European and Asian descent, picking out 1.58 million of the most common single-letter variations in the genetic code. This article also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and other publications.
[more]

2.18.2005
"New Scientist"
Genetic variation map may promise tailored drugs

Writer Will Knight reports that "a new map of genetic 'signposts' that reveal general variations in the human genome could lead to more effective, genetically-tailored drugs. A study of 1.58 million genetic markers across 71 individuals of different genetic heritage showed that the markers correspond to general genetic variation... But the researchers - from Perlegen Sciences, the Computer Science Institute in California and the University of California, San Diego, all in the US - stress that this does not mean people with different ancestral history can be divided into discrete groups on a genetic basis." Jacobs School computer scientist and Calit2 researcher Eleazar Eskin co-authored the study that appeared in the Feb. 18 issue of Science magazine.
[more]

2.17.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Wireless technology to the rescue

In an Op-Ed article, Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao argues that wireless technology could have saved thousands of lives in the wake of the Indian Ocean tsunami, and explains how the institute's RESCUE is developing technologies that could improve communications in future disasters.
[more]

1.31.2005
"GRIDtoday"
UCSD Expands Cyberinfrastructure Program to China, Thailand

In its special-features section, the online news service highlights the expansion of the Pacific Rim Undergraduate Research Experiences (PRIME) program, which will double the number of UCSD students working on research projects related to cyberinfrastructure, with students deployed to Japan, Taiwan, China, Thailand and Australia. The principal investigator on the NSF-funded project is Gabriele Wienhausen, Provost of Sixth College and leader of Calit2's Education activities at UCSD, with support from Peter Arzberger, director of UCSD's Life Sciences Initiative and deputy leader of Calit2's Digitally Enabled Genomic Medicine layer on the campus.

[more]

1.27.2005
"Irvine World News"
Technology Transfers Debated

The approach a university takes in licensing transactions, also called "technology transfers," and the approach a corporation takes were compared and contrasted during "The Art of Research and Technology Transfer," a multi-lecture/panel-discussion conference held at the University Club on the UC Irvine campus. The event was sponsored by OCTANe @ UCI, the Orange County Technology Action Network, a Calit2 partner.
[more]

1.24.2005
"Chicago Sun-Times"
Major players put Chicago on map for grid computing

In a sidebar titled "Central location makes city right site for grid work," business reporter Howard Wolinsky reports on the emergence of Chicago as a center of grid computing research and rollouts. He quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr in his capacity as founding director of the National Center of Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois, as writing that "Chicago is an artifact of the emergence of infrastructure." The quote is from the new book Grid 2 -- edited by Argonne's Ian Foster, a grid computing pioneer.
[more]

1.24.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Broadcom: Hope for Unrealized Ambitions

UC Irvine hopes chipmaker Broadcom Corp.'s move to the University Research Park adjacent to UCI will facilitate interaction and spur cooperation between the high-tech company and the research element of the university.
[more]

1.23.2005
"Daily Pilot"
Technology Plays Tunes

LEMUR exhibit (League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots) is open at UC Irvine's Beall Center for Art & Technology Jan.14-March 19. The exhibit showcases robotic instruments that can play themselves.
[more]

1.21.2005
"OC Weekly"
Over the Cliffs; LEMUR Follows the Crowd

LEMUR sounded like it would be AWESOME: the League of Electronic Musical Robots would be performing at UC Irvine’s Beall Center for Art and Technology, which almost always has rocking robotics; even when installations are Pong-era blips, they’re ironically and nostalgically so. And robots make everybody happy, especially if they’re robot butlers or talking cars. But mostly robot butlers.
[more]

1.19.2005
"TelecomFlash"
Honolulu: Broadband's Playground

In a report from Honolulu, Steve McClelland reports on efforts to develop "the Pacific’s very first 'Broadband Playground.'" He quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as calling optical networks "change agents" for science. Writes McClelland: "Smarr says scientists in Tokyo will be able to routinely swap their 300 Terabytes of climatological data with the counterparts at the Max Planck Institute in Germany... Smarr sees HDTV sea bed sensors remotely monitored by optical cable but warns scientists will need to be flexibly minded to take full advantage of the new systems. [He] compares the situation with that of 1985 when only 100 people in the U.S. were able to capitalize on the power of newly-developed supercomputers. Flexibility of mind to capitalize on global-scale networking is what Smarr seems to be saying is needed."
[more]

1.14.2005
"San Diego Metropolitan"
Daily Business Report

"And you thought your cable at home was fast," is the kicker on a story about UCSD announcing that it is now connected via a production 10 gigabit connection to CENIC's CalREN backbone network. The daily columnsquotes Chancellor Marye Anne Fox as saying, "While we have other, faster connections for specialized research projects on campus, the new 10 gigabit Ethernet connection enables every campus member to access the full power of broadband and access the global Internet and Internet2 community at large." The article goes on to note that "other institutions at UCSD that are participating in the high-performance campus network include the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology."
[more]

1.13.2005
"FreshNews.com"
Production 10 Gigabit Ethernet Campus Link to CalREN

The San Diego technology e-newsletter and website report that UCSD upgraded from a one gigabit connections to the CalREN high-performance backbone network for California universities, to "the first production 10 gigabit Ethernet campus connection in the United States...  This new link provides unprecedented wide area network capacity to UCSD's students, faculty and staff." Calit2 participated in the deployment of the new Internet bandwidth, which will also support several networking projects such as the Calit2-led OptIPuter.
[more]

1.13.2005
"SoCalTech.com"
UCSD, CENIC Wire 10G Network

The online news service reports that UCSD and CENIC "have connected the first 10 Gigabit Ethernet broadband network into CENIC's high performance backbone network, CalREN. The connection gives UCSD students and staff the highest performance, production 10G campus connection in the U.S."  
[more]

1.12.2005
"RedNova"
Phoning Home From the Ocean Floor Via Computer

The online science news service reports on the LOOKING ocean observatory project led by UCSD and the University of Washington. Calit2 director Larry Smarr is co-PI on the project. [This article first appeared in Sea Technology Magazine , a subscription-only publication.]
[more]

1.11.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
SDSU center will help guide tsunami relief workers

Science reporter Bruce Lieberman reports on efforts at SDSU's visualization center to provide detailed satellite maps and imaging to help relief agencies in the tsunami-struck Indian Ocean region. He quotes the center's co-director, professor Eric Frost, who has led the collaboration between UCSD and SDSU researchers within Calit2.
[more]

1.10.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Executive Summary: Top Stories

Irvine-based Broadcom Corp. signed a blockbuster $183 million lease with The Irvine Company for 685,000 square feet of space in eight buildings at University Research Park near the University of California, Irvine.
[more]

1.6.2005
"IGN Insider"
Robots Like Music Too

LEMUR (The League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots) is bringing their unique, mechanically inclined brand of sound to UC Irvine's Beall Center for Art and Technology.
[more]

1.5.2005
"Orange County Register"
Broadcom move a boon to UCI

Chip maker Broadcom Corp.'s move to the University Research Park, adjacent to UC Irvine, will lead to more collaboration with the university, including the schools of engineering and computer science, and Calit².
[more]

1.4.2005
"Technology Review"
What Lies Beneath

The crustal plates that lie beneath miles of ocean are in constant movement, shifting imperceptibly every second. But the seismologists who track them have had to rely on an investigative schedule dictated by the calendar, rather than the clock. John Orcutt, deputy director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Calit2 participant, is quoted as saying "now we can create a data grid of sensors that all forward their data to the system... The tricky part is to interact intelligently with the sensors. That’s something that hasn't been done much. We're using it for seismology, but it's applicable to meteorology, oceanography -- all sorts of fields in which you're using instruments remotely." 

[more]

1.4.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Broadcom Moving to Research Park

Irvine chipmaker Broadcom has struck a deal to move its headquarters to the city's University Research Park, taking 700,000 square feet in eight buildings. Broadcom plans to move from its current Irvine Spectrum base in two years. The Irvine Company, which owns University Research Park, plans to put up buildings for the chipmaker.
[more]

1.1.2005
"Cabling Business Magazine"
The Ultimate Playground for IT Imagineers

Extensive cabling technology was needed to supply the flexible communications infrastructure required in the Calit2 Irvine building. This article details the design and technology used in the new 120,000-square-foot building. 
[more]

1.1.2005
"OC Weekly"
Basic Programming: OP_ERA Beginning to See the Light

A review of the OP_ERA exhibit currently on display at UCI's Beall Center.
[more]

1.1.2005
"MSNBC"
Robo Roach: Bionic Bug Takes Control of the Driver's Seat

Calit2 and ACE graduate student Garnet Hertz uses hissing cockroaches to navigate robotic vehicles.
[more]

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